Arts

Burning Basket is Sunday

The 14th annual Homer Burning Basket project of community interactive, impermanent art, is presented to Homer this coming Sunday afternoon at the build site at Mariner Park on the Homer Spit. Construction continues today through Saturday, and volunteers are invited to help finish the basket or provide nightly security.

Te`arama group visits peninsula

Between Aug. 14 and 19, Seattle-based Tahitian performance group Te`arama conducted cultural exchanges with communities around the lower Kenai Peninsula. Coordinated by the Pratt Museum, Te’arama performed for and alongside members of the Kenaitze Indian Tribe, Ninilchik Traditional Council, Nanwalek Village and Port Graham Village. In each community, they presented short workshops on traditional drumming and dancing styles from Tahiti. Among the opportunities offered by generous Kenai communities, Te’arama members were invited to the Ninilchik Traditional Council’s setnet site, enjoyed extended stays and travel by skiff between Nanwalek and Port Graham, and visited the Kenaitze Indian Tribe’s K’Beq Heritage Site. In addition to pickup basketball games and riding four wheelers in the woods, conversations overheard spanned the importance of language preservation, contemporary music, the impact of colonialism in urban and village settings and cultural pride.

September shows feature last summer exhibits

First Friday kicks off the Labor Day weekend with the last summer showing of art shows. At the Homer Council on the Arts, the show’s title, “From the Earth,” also will be reflected in a special event for a gallery show: a potluck reception with gifts from local harvests. Brian Grobleski’s photographs of food contrast with original earth art (as in made from) — ceramic art by David Kaufmann, Maygen Lotscher, Gundega Snepste and Jeff Szarzi. Grobleski’s photographs were featured in Eve and Eivin Kilcher’s cookbook, “Homestead Kitchen,” and he will be signing books at the show.

cARTography exhibit blends art, mapmaking

The Pratt Museum’s latest exhibit, cARTography, makes a typeface play, emphasizing “art” in the word. That also pays respect to the tradition of defining the geographic world on paper — on, in modern technology, in digital form. While there can be technical precision in acquiring data to make maps, how a cartographer uses line, shading, color and perspective to illustrate that information speaks as much to the map maker’s artistic vision.

CACS installs new mural

Artist Brad Hughes installed a new mural at last Friday at the Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies. Part of a 35th anniversary remodeling effort to make the environmental education nonprofit’s building more visible, the mural shows two children wading in a tidepool and exploring marine life. Words on the mural encourage people to “explore, connect, protect.” In a nod to classical imagery, a boy reaches out to touch an octopus, an allusion to Michelangelo’s “The Creation of Adam” mural on the Sistine Chapel. The remodel will include more murals on the side and front of the building.

Salmonfest: Rusted Root defies genre

Since 1990, Pittsburgh, Pa., band Rusted Root has been shaking up the music scene like a magnitude-9 earthquake in a rickety log cabin. Though they’ve performed concerts in Anchorage and elsewhere in Alaska, for the first time ever Rusted Root performs at Salmonfest, the three-day festival of fish, fun and music held Friday-Sunday at the Kenai Peninsula Fairgrounds, Ninilchik.

New book captures some of Homer’s favorite flavors

The lunch rush is over, but there’s still a steady stream of customers through the door of Cosmic Kitchen on a recent Friday afternoon. Over the banter of diners and clatter in the kitchen and interruptions that include buying some fresh halibut, owners Sean Hogan and Michelle Wilson take a break to talk about their newest endeavor.

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