Lori Evans

Homer DDF team wins at Anchorage meet

Over the weekend, the Homer High School DDF Team competed at Bartlett High School. The team brought home the following awards, including a Duo Interpretation sweep. The DDF Team competed against 10 other schools, Bartlett, East Anchorage, West Anchorage, Eagle River, Chugiak, South Anchorage, Service High, Dimond High, Seward and Hope. There were more than 150 competitors.

Oxygen therapy being used to treat a variety of medical issues

Dr. Patrick Huffman and his staff joke that they may nickname the latest tool in their disease-fighting arsenal R2-O2.

The resemblance of the low-pressure hyperbaric oxygen chamber in Huffman’s Frontier Natural Health office in Homer to the beloved Star Wars’ robot character R2-D2 is hard to miss. The hyperbaric chamber is white and cylindrical and looks almost to have a face like R2-D2. Both have dials and gauges. Both are resourceful in the way they work — and, yes, both are a little tech-y.

'My Old Dog': Read it and be inspired

Seattle journalist Laura T. Coffey resisted when a reader suggested she write a story about a Los Angeles photographer who took pictures of older dogs in animal shelters in an effort to increase their chances of getting adopted.

It was the summer of 2013 and Coffey’s mother had recently died. The story sounded too sad to tackle. Who wanted to read about old dogs waiting out their last days in crowded animal shelters — even if some photographer was trying to help them?

Personal decisions define first book

Homer writer McKibben Jackinsky’s first book, “Too Close to Home? Living with ‘drill baby’ on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula” tells the story of recent oil and gas development on the southern peninsula through the voices of property owners who have been affected by that development.

Because Jackinsky is one of those property owners, it is also her story and her family’s story.

Homer shows pay tribute to pop artist David Bowie

Homer musician Tyler Munns has always been an avid David Bowie fan. So when the pop musician’s album “Blackstar” was released Jan. 8, Munns didn’t waste any time listening to it.

He wasn’t disappointed. 

“It was so much more challenging and innovative than any artists in their prime right now. It was just kind of mind blowing to me,” says Munns.

Two days after the album’s release, the 69-year-old Bowie was dead of cancer.

His death on the heels of the album’s release had a profound effect on Munns.

Editorial: If we don’t change, we may lose very thing we want to save

One of the great debates — or should we say vigorous discussions — shaping up for 2016 is that of health care on the local, state and national level.

On one point most of us agree: Something’s got to be done. Escalating costs are not sustainable.

On the best way to solve the myriad of problems associated with health care — including high costs — there’s plenty of room for disagreement and different diagnoses of what ails the industry.

Walker encourages Alaskans to pull together out of mire

Gov. Bill Walker on Friday encouraged two diverse Homer audiences not to overreact or panic as the state makes some changes and figures its way out of a budget deficit of about $3.5 billion.

Contrary to “Alaska being on the rocks,” as one BBC reporter said during a recent interview, Walker said, “We don’t have a wealth problem. We have a cash-flow problem. … We have one hundred billion dollars in wealth. That’s phenomenal.”

Alaska’s savings breaks down to about $55,000 per person in the state.

Classes promote good health through food

Eat your veggies. Aim for a rainbow of colors every day.

Chew your food. Try 20 times per bite.

But skip the milk, cheese and meat. And while you’re at it, take it easy on the salt, sugar and oil.

That’s just a sample of the advice Phil Eherenman gives students in his seven-week Food for Life cooking and nutrition classes, sponsored by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, or PCRM, a nonprofit organization started by Neal Barnard, a medical doctor, author and clinical researcher, in 1985.

Q & A with Vic Fischer

With the first session of the 28th Alaska State Legislature set to adjourn April 14 and with Juneau having celebrated the 100th birthday of the Alaska legislature last month, former state Sen. Vic Fischer has a wish: “I would love to see the kind of bipartisanship that we had during my service in the Legislature in years past. There was a civility and a general feeling of collaboration and cooperation across party lines that we don’t seem to see much anymore.”

'To Russia With Love' Good reminder to all Alaskans about how one person can choose to change things

Vic Fischer had me at hello. From the moment he stepped to the microphone at a classroom on the Kachemak Bay Campus, the 88-year-old Alaska icon awed his audience with unscripted stories of a life that took him from his boyhood in Nazi Germany and Stalinist Russia to a seat at the table in Fairbanks, where Alaska's Constitution was written during the brutal winter of 1955-56.

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