MICHAEL ARMSTRONG

Best Bets

At Monday’s Homer City Council meeting, council member Shelly Erickson suggested a little snow jujitsu.

Squirrel Nut Zippers aim to make America weird again

In modern American music, running counterpoint to overproduced pop there often has been something raw and original to upstage the musical centers of New York, Nashville and Los Angeles. In 1993 a band named after an obscure early 20th century candy took its quirky mix of jazz, blues, klezmer and punk music and not only shattered the conventions of the time, but achieved commercial success.

Yukon musician returns to Homer with eclectic set

If you plugged in “Gordon Tentrees” to an online music radio program, it might start out with something from his last album, “Less is More.” But, as computer algorithms go, the station might throw in songs that evoke the Whitehorse, Yukon Territory singer-songwriter: Bob Dylan, Woody Guthrie and John Prine, all singers Tentree has been compared to. But then you might get some blues acts like Muddy Waters or BB King, straying firmly into Whiskey Tango Foxtrot territory.

Could false nuke alert happen on the Kenai Peninsula?

In September 2014, the National Weather System sent out a false tsunami alarm, triggering tsunami warning sirens in Homer. As happened last Saturday in Hawaii when a technician clicked the wrong box on a program and sent out text alerts of an impending missile attack, the 2014 glitch also happened when a live code got sent out inadvertently. With increased tension over a possible nuclear missile attack from North Korea, those events raise the question: Could a false alert of a missile attack be sent out in Alaska, and if so, how fast would it be corrected? Chances are slim that local authorities would send out a false message like the one that sent Hawaii residents into a panic, Dan Nelson, program manager at Kenai Peninsula Borough Office of Emergency Management, said.

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