Elections

Margaret Stock visits Homer in race against Murkowski

U.S. Senate candidate Margaret Stock visited Homer on Thursday, Sept. 22, meeting with local businesses owners and community members as part of her campaign to overtake incumbent Sen. Lisa Murkowski in the November election. Stock is running as an independent candidate.

Stock is a former officer in the U.S. Army, starting with a commission in the Army Reserve during her time at Boston University and Harvard College, according to the biography on her campaign website, margaretforalaska.com. After graduating from Harvard, she volunteered for active military service in Alaska.

Zak: Alaskans must resolve fiscal crisis now

The State of the City and why we need to advocate against State budget cost shifting and for agreeing on a revenue plan:

In Alaska we are faced with both a low value of oil as well as a low amount of oil coming through the line. The constitutional budget reserve will be completely depleted in FY 18. After that, Alaska’s current revenue structure will produce approximately $1.5 billion in unrestricted general funds (UGF), assuming oil price returns to $55 per barrel.

Stroozas: Sustainable future up to all of us

There are many reasons why we live in Homer but a common denominator exists for each of us who reside “at the end of the road” — the majestic and breathtaking beauty that provides a heartfelt appreciation for the wonders of nature and the cordiality of our community.

Homer’s future is up to us; each and every one, young or old, rich or poor. We each have a role and varied opinions regarding our economic and social issues. I have a vision for our community that I will work diligently toward over the next three years as a member of the City Council.

Ketter: Reopening Boys and Girls Club would help Homer

I am unsure which topic I wanted to address in this column because I am passionate about many topics.

I am concerned about our community. I want to see more togetherness, especially concerning real life issues that directly affect the people. Issues such as financial problems and drug addiction, both of which cause some major problems within families and their homes.

Kimberly Ketter's felony DUI does not disqualify her from city council race

Questions raised last week as to whether Homer City Council candidate Kimberly Ketter is eligible to run for office as a result of her felony conviction for driving under the influence were based on false information.

Ketter can run for the city council seat while on probation.

The city’s declaration of candidacy form requires a candidate to declare that he or she is a qualified voter in order to run for office. Ketter is eligible to vote, and therefore is eligible to run for city council, because she has not been convicted of a felony involving moral turpitude.

Q & A with Candidates for Homer Mayor & City Council

1. What is your vision for Homer?

Mayoral candidate David Lewis: First, I envision Homer as a Four Season Destination for recreation that includes eco tourism, outdoor activities and the arts. Second, we should strive to become the main destination for large vessel haul out and repairs, Third, if we get the East boat Harbor funded and built we may become home port for many new vessels.

KPB Prop 2 won’t hike taxes to pay for SPH improvements

As Kenai Peninsula Borough and Homer voters face a slate of bond propositions and tax changes, KPB Proposition 2 could be an easy sell for voters for one simple reason: It won’t take a dime from taxpayers.

The proposition asks voters to approve a general obligation bond of up to $4.8 million to expand South Peninsula Hospital’s Homer Medical Clinic and install a new hospital operating room air handling and ventilation system. Because of increased property values in the SPH Service Area, that won’t require a mill rate increase.

Prop 1 would bring cop shop into 21st century say proponents

In considering Homer Proposition 1, a proposal to borrow up to $12 million to build a new Homer Police Station, the controversy isn’t whether or not police need a new station.

Even opponents of Prop 1 say it’s clear the 39-year-old station needs replacement. The debate is over the cost and how to pay for it.

“I think they deserve a new facility,” said Homer City Council Member Heath Smith. “I think the community can afford to provide that, but I don’t think we should have to afford what’s currently being proposed.”

City, borough elections to be held Oct. 4

Two candidates are running for Homer Mayor and three candidates are running for two, 3-year Homer City Council seats. The city also will hold an election on Proposition No. 1, to approve general obligation bonds for a new police station and a 0.65-percent seasonal sales tax increase to fund the bonds.

For profiles on the city candidates, see pages 5-7. In the Sept. 22 issue candidates will answer questions posed by the Homer News, and in the Sept. 29 issue we will publish commentaries by them.

Running for mayor in order of filing are: Bryan Zak and David Lewis

Kimberly Ketter: In Homer for a new start

Kimberly Ketter moved to Homer in May 2015 from her hometown of Cranberry Township, Pa., looking for a fresh start.

Following a painful custody battle which ended with limited rights to see her son, Ketter moved to Homer to live with a family friend who had retired and moved into a house on West Hill. In addition to giving her the chance to gain a handle on her life and find her career path so when she could see her son, she would be more stable, she was able to help the friend with the upkeep of his house.

Shelly Erickson: Roots go deep into Homer

When Homer City Council candidate Shelly Erickson says that Homer is her home, her words refer to roots that go deep into past generations. Both sides of her family have been in Homer for close to 80 years.

Three candidates — Erickson, Tom Stroozas, and Kimberly Ketter — are running for the two seats open on the city council. The two candidates with the highest number of votes will win those seats. Incumbent Gus VanDyke and Bryan Zak are not running again, though Zak is running for mayor.

Tom Stroozas: Wants to serve community

Tom Stroozas is a transplant from the Lower 48, similar to many Homer residents who visited, were captured by Homer’s beauty and decided to make a home here. Now, he looks to the city council as a way to serve the town he has called home since 2006.

“I believe that you should live your life so that when you’re gone it will have mattered and if by being elected to the city council in Homer I can make a difference in the quality of life of everyone who lives here, then that’s a good sense of well-being,” Stroozas said.

Council member Bryan Zak: his experience qualifies him

With his 3-year term expiring this October, veteran Homer City Council member Bryan Zak chose not to run for re-election and instead shifted his focus to another city office: Homer mayor.

Like opponent David Lewis, Zak was first elected to the council in 2008. Zak, 60, won a 2-year seat that came open when former council member Lane Chesley resigned, and then won re-election to regular 3-year seats in 2010 and 2013.

Council member David Lewis: running to give voters a choice

Three-term Homer City Council member and Mayor Pro-Tempore David Lewis said he’s running for one simple reason.

“I thought about it for a while. I wanted to see who put their name in,” he said. “I don’t think it should be a giveaway job. I think there should be competition.”

Lewis, 62, faces fellow council member Bryan Zak in the mayoral race. The most senior members on the council, both bring extensive experience to the race. While Zak has been running a strong campaign with yard signs and advertising, Lewis has been out of the country on a tour of Mongolia and Japan.

Victory behind him, Seaton looks ahead to fiscal challenge

After a resounding win Tuesday in the Republican Party Primary for the House District 31 seat, Rep. Paul Seaton, R-Homer, looked ahead to the challenge of the next session.

“We’ve got a big problem to solve. Our biggest concern is making sure we solve this fiscal problem in a way that’s sustainable over time. I think we can get there,” Seaton said in a phone interview on Wednesday.

Seaton easily wins Republican Party race for District 31 rep

Despite a well-funded, negative campaign by political action committees against him, incumbent Rep. Paul Seaton, R-Homer, easily won election in Tuesday’s primary for the District 31 House seat.

Seaton said negative campaigning backfired and probably helped him in the three-way Republican contest.

With no other candidates running in the general election, barring a write-in campaign, Seaton, 70, will be elected to an eighth term in the Alaska House of Representatives.

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