Letters

Right to bear arms not new idea

I appreciated Rev. Richard Olson’s letter wherein he spoke of the  “true purpose of the Second Amendment.” He said, “They (founding fathers) meant in no uncertain terms that all citizenry, all common people, should be fully armed and know how to use.” Who can argue with such plain truth? 

SPH: Please observe visiting hours

It is important to all of us at South Peninsula Hospital that we provide a safe, comfortable environment in which to be cared for. And we are proud to provide that for you locally, right here in the community, keeping you close to home and your loved ones. It is our goal that all who come to the hospital — both as a patient or a visitor — feel welcomed and safe here. 

Consumers shouldn’t have to figure out what’s toxic; pass House Bill 96

I recently attended the 2013 Alaska Youth for Environmental Action’s (AYEA) Civics and Conservation Summit where I learned about talking to legislators, how a bill passes and many more skills. I am extremely concerned about House Bill 96, which calls for labeling children’s products that contain toxic chemicals.

Support House Bill 69

What is the true purpose of the Second Amendment? I’ve read more than a hundred well documented and purposely recorded quotations by at least 15 of our major founding fathers explaining exactly what they meant. They meant in no uncertain terms that all the citizenry, all common people, should be fully armed and know how to use. The main reason being as a last defense against rogue government (including domestic) for the preservation of liberty. Take some time, look some up, they were ever so clear exactly what they meant. Google “founding fathers, quotes, guns or arms.”

Setting record straight on ski events

The recent Kachemak Nordic Ski Marathon was a resounding success. I would like to express my extreme gratitude to the groomers who put hundreds of hours into the course, as well as the loyal volunteers who are the backbone of race day.  I also would like to thank the more than 150 skiers who signed up for the event — you’re what it’s all about.

Food issues need to be examined

The Alaska State Legislature is currently in the midst of passing a resolution to request that the governor establish a state food resource development working group within the state. This has brought to light many issues regarding the absence of local foods in Alaska.

WWOOFers: new immigrant class

Every spring, young people called WWOOFers flock to Homer to work in our greenhouses and high tunnels, gardens and homesteads. Whether you call it Worldwide Opportunities on Organic Farms, or Willing Workers on Organic Farms, WWOOFing is a worldwide movement. For the cost of fare to Alaska and some gear, enterprising young people offer their labor on farms and homesteads in return for food and shelter. Alaska WWOOFers are lucky; they often fish and kayak, hike and ski with their hosts. WWOOF hosts share wisdom; WWOOFers share time, energy and youthful enthusiasm.

It was a great season for DDF

I would like to say thank you, on behalf of the Homer High School Drama, Debate and Forensics Team to all those who helped us to have a successful season this year. To all those who donated of their time to help our tournament run smoothly (largest one we've ever had at the high school) and those local businesses who donated to our Random Acts of DDF fundraiser (we raised more than $4,000 in one evening), thank you.

Mahalo for beach party’s success

When the power went out, the potential for panic was present in a packed house full of people dressed for the beach and dancing to the bass. Instead, Roar N' Represent began to sing the sweet sounds of Island Style acapella and at once reinstated a happy and respectful environment, that came together for a great cause, raising funds for the Kachemak Bay Family Planning Clinic.

Big Read fosters sense of community

One of the things that makes Homer unique is its sense of community. The Big Read sponsored by the Friends of the Homer Public Library was meant to foster that sense of community, to give us all a chance to tell our stories, and to open up conversation. Over the course of six weeks, there were book discussion groups, art classes, lectures, a visit from Tim O'Brien and much more. The best part of the Big Read was the support it received from the everyone involved.

Let’s celebrate our differences

To begin with, thank you, Andrea Van Dinther, for your latest column, "A mother's take on burlesque, friendship," in which you offer your personal moral dilemma about burlesque in Homer. I would especially like to thank you for acknowledging that your column was a personal investigation of what makes you uncomfortable. I do that, too. It's something we should all do, routinely. Thank you for being so brave to voice it.

Council forces gas on citizens

One need not look to Washington, D.C., or Juneau for injustice that is forced on people by those in power. We in Homer need to look no further than our city council. Let me explain: We all need fuel to provide the energy needed to live and we basically have three different kinds, namely, electricity, oil and wood. Now a fourth is soon to be forced upon us. Those who provide electricity and oil pay in full for the products and for its delivery to their customers who of their own free will choose to purchase it.

O’Brien’s book: a good read

The students at Homer Flex chose to participate in The Big Read and read Tim O'Brien's "The Things They Carried." This book is about O'Brien's experiences in Vietnam, the good and the bad, and takes a dip into his past and untold stories. This is one of the best nonfiction novels I have read.

Author brings timely message

I would like to sincerely thank the Friends of the Homer Public Library for bringing Tim O'Brien to Homer and highlighting his book "The Things They Carried" through the Big Read. O'Brien spoke March 1 at Mariner Theatre — a free event with an award winning, engaging, thoughtful and thought-provoking writer. I was deeply moved by his stories, his intention of testimony and finding ways through story to share not only events and places, but feeling and emotion.

Survey just one part of assessment

MAPP of the Southern Kenai Peninsula has recently compiled the results of the "Perceptions of Community Health" survey that was distributed to the community in November and December 2012. This survey is just one component of our second Community Health Needs Assessment that is underway.

Many thanks to the 1,180-plus community members who provided their input on our community's needs and strengths as this information helps us identify priority issues from the community's perspective.

Grant provides youth opportunity

The Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies would like to thank the City of Homer Grants Program administered through the Homer Foundation for the operational grant received in 2012. Operational funds are difficult for nonprofit organizations to raise, yet extremely important to the functions of an organization.

We are one of many nonprofits that offer important services to Homer residents. These local government dollars support our outdoor education program that reached over 3,258 youth in 2012.

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