New Boathouse dedicated; Spit bathrooms to be built

  • Isla Brown, age 5, sits on Wildheart, the Giving Salmon, sculpture Saturday, May 12, 2018 at the ribbon cutting for the Homer Boat House. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
  • Isla Brown, age 5, sits on Wildheart, the Giving Salmon, sculpture Saturday, May 12, 2018 at the ribbon cutting for the Homer Boat House. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
  • A couple sits on the steps of the Boat House last Saturday, May 12, 2018 after the ribbon cuttingof the new shelter at the Homer Harbor. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
  • People walk by Wildheart, the Giving Salmon, sculpture Saturday, May 12, 2018 after the ribbon cutting for the Homer Boat House. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
  • Wildheart, the Giving Salmon sculpture, and the Ramp 2 restroom are framed in a window of the Boat House Saturday, May 12, 2018 at the Homer Harbor. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
  • Children gather around Wildheart, the Giving Salmon, sculpture last Saturday at the ribbon cutting for the Homer Boat House. Christina Demetro of Anchorage created the sculpture with assistance from Homer community members, including children. (Photo by Kathyrn Henry)

The latest improvement to the Homer Harbor got officially dedicated last Saturday while funding has been secured for the next harbor project, new bathrooms at Ramp 2.

Spearheaded by the Homer Foundation, and funded largely through donations and grants, the Homer Boat House Pavillion now adds shelter for harbor users staging at the top of Ramp 2 on the Spit. Also dedicated was Wildheart, the Homer Foundation’s Giving Salmon sculpture, public art that also functions as a giant piggy bank for people to make donations to the foundation. Designed by Anchorage architect firm ECI / Hyer, who donated services, the $240,000 Boat House project is built on the site of the old harbor office.

Volunteer Ken Castner coordinated the project. Anchorage sculptor Christina Demetro created Wildheart as a community art project. Demetro visited Homer schools and enlisted the assistance of students in making the clay piece that formed the cast of the sculpture.

In a press release last Friday, the city announced it had received a $263,000 Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) matching grant to replace the Ramp 2 public restroom. Originally built with a 1972 LCWF grant, the Ramp 2 restroom is the oldest restroom at the harbor.

The new restrooms will be built on the same foundation. At Monday night’s Homer City Council meeting, the council introduced an ordinance accepting the grant money. It also will consider an ordinance to further fund the project using commerical vessel passenger tax funds. Construction of the new restrooms will start after the end of the tourist season in September.

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