Creating writers with community

Creating writers through community

From the outside, the Kachemak Bay Writers’ Conference may seem like any other event taking place at Land’s End Resort, but a step closer reveals a strong community of growing individuals unified by a passion for putting words on a page — for creating a story.

Over the conference, attendees are given a plethora of options for workshops, panels, writing circles, and — perhaps most importantly — sharing.

It takes a village to raise a doctor

If all goes according to plan, one day Homer native Ben Kuhns will be a doctor. However, before deciding to pursue a medical career, he was a slope worker, crab fisherman and a gold miner. This was all after he graduated with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in forensic science, of course.

“I tried to get the whole Alaska experience because I didn’t know when I’d be able to get that experience again,” Kuhns said. “I was paid dividends not only in it gives you life experience but you’re able to have conversations with people and relate to people.”

Years Ago in Homer

20 years ago in the Homer News:

Several suspicious fires had city fire officials concerned, especially as the danger of wildfire was relatively high, said Homer Fire Chief Robert Purcell. Firefighters responded to an abandoned house deliberately set on fire, a blaze that took four hours to put out, on June 17, 1996. The newly cleared subdivisions on Skyline Drive were also a frequent target of vandals.

– From the issue of June 20, 1996

30 years ago in the Homer News:

Homer to see road projects in 2018

Downtown Homer will see two big road projects for summer 2018, a rehabilitation and drainage improvements for Lake Street between East End Road and the Sterling Highway, and repaving of Pioneer Avenue from Lake Street to the Sterling Highway. Of the two, Lake Street see the biggest changes, with these improvements:

• Widening of Lake Street to include a 6-foot bike lane on either side,

• Improved drainage, including directing water from the east side into culverts and toward Beluga Slough to the south,

• Improved ditching,

Keep out: Kenai Peninsula land managers work together to curb invasive species

Wearing a pump-powered backpack sprayer, long yellow gloves and protective goggles, Jen Peura looked more like she was out hunting ghosts than killing flowers.

The seasonal biotech for the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge pointed to a thin, leafy sprig near the narrow Egumen Lake trail. The innocuous-looking plant blended in with the grasses around it, bearing only a small knot of a bud at the top.

Thursday, June 23

PRE-K PUFFINS EARLY LEARNING PROGRAM

10 a.m.-11:30 a.m., Alaska Islands & Ocean Visitor Center

ESTUARY HIKES AT ISLANDS AND OCEAN

11 a.m.-noon, Alaska Islands & Ocean Visitor Center

YOGA FOR KIDS

11 a.m.-noon, Homer Public Library

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS

noon, 8 p.m., Hillas Building

3D PRINTING CLASSES: WEARABLE ART

12:30 p.m., Homer Makerspace

RANGER TALK: ‘BEAR VIEWING-FUN OR FOLLY?’

1-1:30 p.m., Alaska Islands & Ocean Visitor Center

SUMMER MAKER CAMP @ HPL

Legislature adjourns; Walker calls fifth special session

It’s over, but not done.

At 11:46 a.m. Sunday, the Alaska Senate adjourned the fourth special session of the 29th Alaska Legislature.

Forty minutes later, Gov. Bill Walker issued a proclamation stating that the fifth special session will begin on July 11. On its agenda will be three items: Using the earnings of the Alaska Permanent Fund to pay for government operations, reforms to the state’s system of oil and gas drilling subsidies, and a suite of tax increases.

Borough sees increase in oil property values

The values of some oil and gas properties in the Kenai Peninsula Borough jumped in the most recent state assessment, producing about $1.1 million more for the borough in property taxes.

Much of that increase comes from the Nikiski area, where the tax values for the year increased by approximately $559,991, according to the borough’s fiscal year 2017 budget.

The increase allowed for a mill rate decrease for residents of Nikiski from 2.90 to 2.80 for the next year. The borough assembly approved the new mill rate at its June 7 meeting.

Announcements

The Exchange, a pilot syringe exchange program, offers free syringe exchanges every other Tuesday at the South Peninsula Hospital Training Center, 203 West Pioneer Avenue, in the southwest corner of the building. Exchanges are held 5-7 p.m. The next Exchange is July 5. The Exchange is a program established and operated by a group of individuals and agency representatives in the Homer area that support the idea of harm-reduction and safer drug use as a means of making our community a safer place to live.

Good fishing draws crowds to South Peninsula

I usually don’t fish on the weekends because it’s a great time to cruise the river accesses and The Spit to determine what’s being nailed, where and how, while listening to “scout’s honor” tales told ’round the cleaning tables.

Besides, being the size of a mutant Wookie, it would take a majorly modified shoehorn to fit me into some of my favorite spots when the hordes descend on the Kenai.

Last Saturday was a prime example of The Spit and its infamous fishing lagoon returning to the days when parking spaces and elbow room were at a premium.

Basketball takes Nikolaevsk native to next level

Two years ago, Nianiella Dorvall left her hometown of Nikolaevsk to attend Skagit Valley College in the state of Washington, making her Nikolaevsk School’s first female to play basketball at the college level. This June, Dorvall graduated with an associate degree in biology, a 3.97 grade point average, an award as a top scholar-athlete, and a full-ride scholarship to the public Washington university of her choice.

First tagged fish of the season caught

Anglers visiting Homer from various spots in the Lower 48 caught four tagged fish in the past two weeks, according to Jackpot Halibut Derby coordinator Kim Royce. Two of the fish caught had previous years’ tags, which are worth $100. One fish was released as part of the over-48-inches catch-and-release drawing for $1,000.

Garrett Tyson from Orlando, Florida, caught a fish with a 2015 tag on June 9. Tyson was fishing on the SeaWolf with Capt. Philip Warren from Inlet Charters.

Group says fracking will harm Cook Inlet beluga whales

ANCHORAGE — A national environmental group is asking federal fisheries officials to block a drilling company’s plans for offshore hydraulic fracturing in Alaska’s Cook Inlet.

The Center for Biological Diversity says fracking by BlueCrest Energy will threaten endangered beluga whales.

The group says no hydraulic fracturing by the Fort Worth, Texas-based company should be allowed unless there’s additional environmental review.

Hydraulic fracturing is the extraction of oil and gas from rock through injection of high-pressure mixtures of water, sand and chemicals.

Bike Bucks? Ride for food to Homer Farmers Market

The Homer Farmers Market is in the perfect location.

Very few markets have the good fortune of a permanent location so that tents and infrastructure can stay up all summer.

That means that instead of just a pop-up tent village, our Market booths are more permanent, hand built, and full of personality.

I’ll just say it: we have a cute Farmers Market.

Permanent Fund exec: Dividend bill too optimistic

FAIRBANKS (AP) — The bill to restructure the Alaska Permanent Fund to help pay for government could be too optimistic about the market, the head of the corporation that manages the fund told the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner editorial board Tuesday.

Angela Rodell, the CEO of the Alaska Permanent Fund Corp., said an annual draw of 5.25 percent of the market value of the fund could be tough to meet every year. That money would come from the fund’s earnings reserve account, not the fund’s principal.

David E. Hanrahan

David E. Hanrahan

1937-May 31, 2016

David “Dave” Earl Hanrahan, 79, died in his sleep of natural causes on Tuesday, May 31, 2016.

A memorial will be held at 4 p.m. Saturday, July 2, 2016, at the Homer United Methodist Church, 770 East End Road.

Proposal would move hospital service area south

A proposed ordinance before the Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly would move the hospital service area boundary south.

The move would shift Ninilchik from the South Kenai Peninsula Hospital Service Area to the Central Kenai Peninsula Hospital Service Area, resulting in a drop in the mill rate for Ninilchik property owners. Residents of the southern service area pay a mill rate of approximately 2.3, while central peninsula service area residents pay a rate of .01.

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