Lord: Excited for the opportunity to serve Homer

When I was in graduate school in Fairbanks I was a “Big Sister” through Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS). My “Little Brother” was autistic, and one of three kids with a hard working single mom. She sought out BBBS to allow her kids more positive adults in their lives, and more strong individual connections in the community. I loved my Little, and sorely missed him when I moved to Homer several years later. I quickly sought out Homer”s BBBS and was matched with a vibrant and energetic six year old living in an incredibly chaotic and unstable situation.

Nustvold: Running to leave Homer better than I found it

My decision to run for a seat on the Homer City Council comes from a desire to leave Homer better than I found it — I owe it to my children and grandchildren. In a time when the financial needs of our City outweigh the funds that are coming in, our Council must put their heads together to find a solution to these shrinking resources as well as carefully scrutinize what is being spent.

Construction starts on Boat House

Construction started on Sept. 6 with a groundbreaking ceremony for the The Boat House Maritime Pavillion on the Homer Spit at the site of the old harbormaster’s office. Last week, contractors began pouring the foundation for the shelter and gathering space at the Homer Harbor. Miranda Weiss, organizer of the project, said most of the work should be done this fall, with final touches being completed next spring. Bay Welding will begin work on a mast to cap off the pavillion’s maritime design.

ADF&G holds planning team meeting on Kachemak Bay Critical Habitat plan revision

An Alaska Department of Fish and Game planning team holds a meeting for revisions to the Kachemak Bay and Fox River Flats Critical Habitat Areas Management Plan. The meeting is 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Oct. 3 at the Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve’s Conference Room, 2181 Kachemak Drive. According to a public notice, the meeting is an agency staff working meeting and will be open for members of the public to observe for the purpose of maintaining transparency in the plan revision process. However, there will not be opportunities for the public to participate in the discussion.

Corps seeks comments on China Poot dock

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers seeks comments on a proposed 125-foot long floating dock, a 100-foot long aluminum gangway and a 607-foot long timber boardwalk to be built below the mean high water mark on the north shore of China Poot Bay. The applicant, Gail Fisher of China Bay LLC, Santa Barbara, Calif., seeks a permit for the projects as part of a development of a commercial lodge and private home for the owners. Fisher proposes construction of the dock to start in October. However, the date for comments was extended from Oct. 3 to a new date of Nov. 2.

CoastWalk cleans up beaches and monitors ecology

Students from McNeil Canyon Elementary School walking the Homer Spit beaches last Friday have become the latest generation of citizen scientists participating in CoastWalk, the annual fall cleanup and beach monitoring project of the Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies. While some kids delight in picking up gross trash, CoastWalk also inspires students to monitor beaches for things like erosion, bird and wildlife sightings, human use and other environmental information.

Japanese naval ships visit Homer

Two Japanese Self Defense Force ships stopped briefly in Homer on their way to a goodwill visit in Anchorage. On Monday morning, Sept. 25, the Japanese Military Self Defense Force vessels Kashima, DD-3508, and Harusame, DD-102, anchored off the Homer Spit. They stayed in Homer until Tuesday evening when they left for Anchorage. Harusame is a training ship and Kashima an escort vessel. The ships left Yokosuka Naval Base in Japan in May and have been visiting ports in the west and east coasts of the United States, Cuba, and Canada as part of training for newly commissioned naval officers. The ships have 600 total crew, including 200 newly commissioned officers.

Town Crier

Tsunami Potential of Grewingk Glacier Lake - A First Look. This presentation will take place at 7 p.m. today at the Alaska Islands and Ocean Visitor Center. Local geologist Ed Berg and colleagues have just completed the first water-depth (bathymetric) survey of the lake and are starting to evaluate the geologic risk of a future collapse and tsunami. This information can be used to design a monitoring program of the unstable mountainside that could provide a warning of incipient collapse and a tsunami in this popular hiking area. This is a free event and for all ages.

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