American flags fly on Sept. 11, 2020, in the park at the corner of Lake Street and the Homer Bypass Road in Homer, Alaska. Rotary Club of Homer Downtown places the flags every year to honor the people killed and injured in the events of Sept. 11, 2001. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

American flags fly on Sept. 11, 2020, in the park at the corner of Lake Street and the Homer Bypass Road in Homer, Alaska. Rotary Club of Homer Downtown places the flags every year to honor the people killed and injured in the events of Sept. 11, 2001. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Best Bets

Best Bets

Last week, the Betster opined on all things autumnal — leaves, chilly mornings, and the trappings of Fall in the Homer. But the Betster neglected to turn an eye to the other things that make Autumn in Homer oh so special.

Fall also marks a return to school — that sure looks different this year and is requiring the heaviest of lifts from our local teachers. Tell ya what, if you see a teacher out and about, buy them a complimentary pumpkin spice latte to thank them for all their hard word. (Or don’t. Depending on the palate of who you’re giving them to — those can be insults, too.)

With fall comes school and with school comes sports. Is there anything more indicative of an American Fall than a chilly September football game? The Bester sure missed watching Homer’s youth display their talent on and off the field/court when sports were canceled in the spring and school was moved online. Now that they’re back (and around to stay as long as the community spread of COVID-19 remains low) the community can once again get back to cheering on their favorite sport team.

It doesn’t matter whether that’s on the gridiron next to Homer High School, dew on the turf field and stunning views of the bay overseeing each play, or up at the Lookout Mountain Trails on Ohlson Mountain Road, where spectators run from one spot on the trails to another to cheer on cross country runners. The fireweed is in its second wind of brilliant red, which served as a gorgeous backdrop to the competition at hand last weekend.

Swimmers are back in the pool and the Lady Mariners are back on the court bumping, setting and spiking their way past the competition as well. And it doesn’t end there. Inside the schools and from the safety of home, students are back to finding myriad ways to shine.

The Betster often hears that young people are our future. Let’s show local students that we really believe that, and find ways to cheer on and support them in this most challenging year, eh Homer?

While you contemplate which part of Fall is your absolute favorite, take a gander at some of these best bets:

BEST SWEET STRINGS BET: Here’s another opportunity to see our marvelous Homer kids doing amazing stuff. Listen to the Homer OPUS string musicians at 5 p.m. Friday at Grace Ridge Brewing. They perform under the direciton of Katie Klann. Keep everyone safe by wearing masks, please. Can’t make it Friday? Feed the tip jar at Grace Ridge, because all tips will go to Homer OPUS for the month of September.

BEST SHARP WITS BET: You know what happens to Homer youth when they grow up and go off to college? They do cool things like write radio plays. Lindsey Schneider just graduated from from the University of Victoria in British Columbia, and she’s adapted her stage play, “Knife Skills,” for radio. The play will be broadcast at 7 p.m. Friday on KBBI AM 890., yet another KBBI radio play production.

Featuring local talent, Schneider’s original piece is the story of four kitchen workers at the edge of the world. A charming executive chef, an ambitious sous chef, a hardened line cook, and an innocent dishwasher form a strong friendship working long hours at a rural deluxe wilderness lodge in Lake Clark National Park. Surrounded by incredible wilderness, the kitchen crew prepares high-end cuisine for the über-rich clientele who come to enjoy luxury recreation at Susitna Lodge. When a prestigious group of Belgian royals visits the lodge, owner John lets sous chef Margo take the reins in the kitchen — but when she accidentally discovers her executive chef’s biggest secret, she must choose between her ambition and her friendships before they both disintegrate. Touching on themes of ambition, sexism and betrayal, Knife Skills is the untold drama of working in the Bush.

Missed the live stream? Tune in at anytime on KBBI.org starting Saturday, Sept. 19.

BEST NEVER FORGET BET: The VFW Post 10221 in Anchor Point is hosting a POW and MIA Recognition Day at 5:30 p.m. this Friday. This is an event to remember prisoners of war and those missing in action, and is open to the public.

BEST KEEP HARVESTING BET: The Farmers Market won’t be around for all the much longer. If you’ve been holding on out going, now’s the time to take advantage of those late season veggies. The Market is open on Wednesdays from 2-5 p.m. as well as Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Ocean Drive.

“Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, catches fire in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2020, near Homer, Alaska. Artist Mavis Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

“Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, catches fire in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2020, near Homer, Alaska. Artist Mavis Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

As Peggy Paver right, watches, Mavis Muller, left, places a note in”Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2020, near Homer, Alaska. Artist and coordinator Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

As Peggy Paver right, watches, Mavis Muller, left, places a note in”Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2020, near Homer, Alaska. Artist and coordinator Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Mavis Muller, left, and Matt Steffy, right, light on fire “Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2020, near Homer, Alaska. Artist and coordinator Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Mavis Muller, left, and Matt Steffy, right, light on fire “Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2020, near Homer, Alaska. Artist and coordinator Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

“Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, catches fire in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2020, near Homer, Alaska. Artist Mavis Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

“Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, catches fire in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, 2020, near Homer, Alaska. Artist Mavis Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

“Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, catches fire in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, near Homer. Artist Mavis Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

“Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, catches fire in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, near Homer. Artist Mavis Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

As Peggy Paver right, watches, Mavis Muller, left, places a note in”Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, near Homer. Artist and coordinator Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

As Peggy Paver right, watches, Mavis Muller, left, places a note in”Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, near Homer. Artist and coordinator Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Mavis Muller, left, and Matt Steffy, right, light on fire “Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, near Homer. Artist and coordinator Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Mavis Muller, left, and Matt Steffy, right, light on fire “Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, near Homer. Artist and coordinator Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

“Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, catches fire in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, near Homer. Artist Mavis Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

“Reimagine,” the 17th annual Burning Basket, catches fire in a field on Sunday, Sept. 13, near Homer. Artist Mavis Muller intended to broadcast live on Facebook and YouTube the burning of the basket, but because of technical difficulties that didn’t happen. “Burning Basket teaches how to let go of expectations and accept the present moment,” Muller wrote in a text message. “Technology is fickle. The basket, however, did exactly what it promised to do. It helod our collective burderns, our memorials, our joys, sadness, fear, and dispersed all of our good intentions in a plume of smoke, sparks and flames.” (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

More in Community

Pets of the week Hamish and Andy. (Photo courtesy Homer Animal Shelter)
Pets of the week: Hamish and Andy

Hamish is a 6-month-old male cat and Andy is a 4 1/2-month-old… Continue reading

The Homer Police Station as seen Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020 in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Megan Pacer/Homer News)
Cops and Courts

Information about fire, police and troopers is taken from public records consisting… Continue reading

Dennis Mahoney
Dennis Mahoney

Dennis Mahoney Aug. 18, 1956 - Oct. 14, 2020 Dennis Mahoney age… Continue reading

Theodora Bowden
Theodora Bowden

Theodora Bowden Feb. 5, 1922 - Sept. 10, 2020 Local Homer resident,… Continue reading

Town Crier

Alaska Elections 101 Episode 4 will be presented virtually from 10:30-11:30 a.m.… Continue reading

Years Ago
Years Ago

Homer happenings from years past

Anglers fish for steelhead in the Anchor River by the Anchor River Bridge on Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020, in Anchor Point, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Best Bets

Representative democracy isn’t pretty, Betster persons. What with a contentious campaign, a… Continue reading

Balls of snickerdoodle dough kept in the freezer is a gift to Future You, photographed on Saturday, Oct. 10, 2020, in Anchorage, Alaska. (Photo by Victoria Petersen/Peninsula Clarion)
Kalifornsky Kitchen: Memories of snickerdoodles

I asked my grandma if she had her mother’s snickerdoodle recipe.

Some of the 45 art quilts featured in "Shifting Tides: Cloth in Convergence," on exhibit from Oct. 9 to Nov. 28, 2020, at the Pratt Museum in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Traveling show at Pratt features Alaska, Pacific Rim artists

‘Shifting Tides’ quilt show explores theme of Pacific Ocean connection

Most Read