Suzanne and Mark Stevens, left, and Peggy James staff Uncle Sam’s Fireworks Stand on Baycrest Hill. Fireworks were then legal to sell in Homer.-Homer News archive photo

Suzanne and Mark Stevens, left, and Peggy James staff Uncle Sam’s Fireworks Stand on Baycrest Hill. Fireworks were then legal to sell in Homer.-Homer News archive photo

Fourth of July fun a long-time tradition

From Seldovia to Homer to Happy Valley, Fourth of July events have been a long-time tradition. Seldovia turns its Independence Day into homecoming for far-flung Seldovians as well as a good old-fashioned, small-town festival. The day’s events include a parade, picnics and events like three-legged and sack races and the popular canoe jousting in the harbor.

Homer hasn’t always had a parade, but in some years they have had fireworks. Before the sale of fireworks was banned on the Kenai Peninsula, locals could buy fireworks at stands like Uncle Sam’s Fireworks on Baycrest Hill. When it got dark enough — or as dark as it can get in mid summer — there might be big fireworks displays on the Homer Spit. In years when Homer didn’t have a parade, there still would be community fun, like the big clambake.

Up the road in Happy Valley, the rodeo, now held in Ninilchik, went on — even when it poured buckets. 

Spectators don’t let rain stop them from enjoying the Happy Valley Fourth of July Rodeo in 1991.-Homer News archive photo

Spectators don’t let rain stop them from enjoying the Happy Valley Fourth of July Rodeo in 1991.-Homer News archive photo

Boys race in the three-legged race for the 1992 Seldovia Fourth of July.-Homer News archive photo

Boys race in the three-legged race for the 1992 Seldovia Fourth of July.-Homer News archive photo

Bradley Bordner rides his tricycle in the 2003 Homer Fourth of July parade.-Homer News archive photo

Bradley Bordner rides his tricycle in the 2003 Homer Fourth of July parade.-Homer News archive photo

Fireworks explode over Kachemak Bay and the Spit for July 4 celebrations in 1993.-Homer News archive photo

Fireworks explode over Kachemak Bay and the Spit for July 4 celebrations in 1993.-Homer News archive photo

Brenda Dolma leads the Red Hot Mamas in the July 2001 Fourth of July parade.-Homer News archive photo

Brenda Dolma leads the Red Hot Mamas in the July 2001 Fourth of July parade.-Homer News archive photo

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