Lauren Winstead, left, an aerialist with Quixotic, teaches Delilah Harris, right, aerial silk techniques on Tuesday in the Homer High School Commons. Quixotic is a Kansas City, Mo., music, dance, circus art and multimedia performance troupe. They perform today and Friday. Both shows are sold out.-Photo by Michael Armstrong, Homer News

Lauren Winstead, left, an aerialist with Quixotic, teaches Delilah Harris, right, aerial silk techniques on Tuesday in the Homer High School Commons. Quixotic is a Kansas City, Mo., music, dance, circus art and multimedia performance troupe. They perform today and Friday. Both shows are sold out.-Photo by Michael Armstrong, Homer News

Homer’s Best Bets

You know how people these days get all harsh and rude, particularly on social media and the interwebs? Yeah, well, that’s Congress for ya. See? That’s mean and petty, isn’t it? Well, PRConsultants Group, a national public relations professional organization, wants to put a stop to that, at least for one day. They’ve declared next Tuesday Snark Free Day.

No, they don’t mean the mythical beast in Lewis Carroll’s “Alice In Wonderland,” which can be charmed with smiles and soap. They’re talkin’ snark as in nasty and sinister.

“We’re asking our friends, colleagues, family and others to share Snark Free Day on Oct. 22 as one day in which we don’t say or write anything snide, sarcastic or mean,” said Kathy Day, an Anchorage PR Consultants Group member.

Hmm. That’s not a bad idea. Think before you speak or write. Be kind. Consider the effects on others. Explore the thought that if you’re nice and respectful of others, hey, they might return the favor. Who knows? It could catch on among politicians, and everyone will work out their differences and solve the real problems of the world.

Once we’ve done that, we can relax and celebrate and have a rockin’ good time, perhaps with these Best Bets:

 

BEST BE CALM BET: Need some serenity in your life? Want to cultivate wisdom and gratitude? Learn all about the ancient practice of mindfulness at the weekly Mindfulness Meeting every Friday from noon-1:30 p.m. at 3691 Ben Walters Lane, Suite 3. South Peninsula Haven House sponsors the free meetings.

 

BEST THE WISDOM OF FISH BET: It’s a rough world out there for a fish with all those sharks, eagles, seals and whales. On top of that, well, a fish has to eat. Jonny Armstrong presents “How Fish Cope in a World of Feast and Famine,” a free video seminar, from noon-1:30 p.m. Friday at Kachemak Bay Campus. Armstrong is a postdoctoral research fellow at the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences. 

 

BEST GO FISH GO BET: Speaking of fish, an always popular Best Bet is the weekly fish feedings at the Pratt Museum. Help feed the fish in the Marine Gallery aquaria at 4 p.m. every Tuesday and Friday. All ages are welcome; free.

 

BEST BE AN ARTIST BET: The Bunnell Street Arts Center artist-in-residence, Melissa Daubert, has been making some cool art at the gallery this month, including, yes, fish. Help her create a community sculpture in a free public workshop from noon to 4 p.m. Saturday at Bunnell. Children under 12 should be accompanied by an adult. Come back on Sunday and bring a dish to share for a community potluck at 6 p.m. Daubert does a slide show and talk about her work. 

 

BEST OOMPAH BET: Dig out those lederhosen and dirndls for the Anchor Point Library’s Oktoberfest from 5-7 p.m. Saturday at the Anchor Point Senior Center. There will be a full German dinner with salad, brats, saurkraut and hot German potato salad just like Frau Hinsch used to make. Tickets are $10 adults, $5 children ages 6-12 and free to children 5 and younger. Proceeds benefit the new public library.

 

BEST JUST LIKE OLD DAYS BET: Back in the 1940s when the Homer Women’s Club held the big Saturday dances out there by Berry’s, that was the place to be. OK, it might have been the only place to be what with 200 people in town. That community spirit continues with the monthly Square and Contra Dance, starting at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at West Homer Elementary School. The China Pooters might not be Pa Svedlund, but they’re pretty darn good. David Stutzer calls the dances. Bring clean, soft-soled shoes to dance in. Beginners are welcome. Admission is $7 and kids age 16 and younger get in free.

 

BEST BOW WOW BET: Need a furry companion to cuddle with this winter — well, other than a fine bearded Homer gentleman? The odds are pretty good you can find a great dog to adopt at the Homer Animal Shelter. October is Adopt a Shelter Dog Month, so stop by noon-5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday to see not just the Pet of the Week, but the Dogs of the Month. Can’t have a dog in your home? You can still help out by brushing dogs or taking them for walks.

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