Alaskans provide ‘People’s Tree’

  • Thursday, December 24, 2015 8:22am
  • News

Alaskans came together in a year-long effort to provide the first tree from Alaska to stand tall as the “People’s Tree.” The U.S. Capitol Christmas tree currently gracing the West Lawn of our nation’s Capitol traveled more than 4,400 miles from the Chugach National Forest by land and sea by the generosity of Alaskans who provided everything from ornaments to cranes to trucks, and many months of their time and care. You can see the labor of love Alaskans shared in the thousands of ornaments on the tree that were made out of recyclable materials and creative flair from people across the state. 

I would like to recognize the many Alaskans who made this undertaking possible and show my appreciation for the beautiful result. Thank you to the children, students, and community members who for the past year joined in this effort by showing your pride for Alaska in making such beautiful and unique ornaments. Thank you to all the artists who created ornament designs that were used as inspiration. I want to extend my gratitude to the groups and individuals who created Alaska-themed tree skirts for the smaller companion trees from the Tongass that are proudly placed in offices throughout the Capitol, including my own. Additionally, I want to thank the individuals and businesses that partnered in this effort with the U.S. Forest Service to showcase Alaska and our tremendous resources. It was no small task and these efforts do not go unnoticed.   

It is an incredible honor that our state provided the U.S. Capitol with its Christmas tree this year. Our 74-foot Lutz spruce shines brightly as a beacon of the holiday spirit for our nation and Alaska takes up no small part of that spotlight. 

U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski

More in News

Christie Hill prepares to play “Taps” during the 9/11 memorial service on Saturday. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)
Homer honors lives lost during 9/11

The Homer-Kachemak Bay Rotary held a Sept. 11 memorial ceremony at the… Continue reading

Judith Eckert
COVID-19 patient says monoclonal antibody infusion saved her life

Antibody infusions highly effective in reducing risk of hospitalization, according to FDA trial ..

A sign flashing “Keep COVID down” also offers information on where to get testing and vaccines on Thursday, Sept. 2, 2021, on the Homer Spit in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
SPH holding steady in COVID-19 surge

Despite hospital crisis in Anchorage, Homer’s hospital not impacted, spokesperson tells Homer City Council.

Brie Drummond speaks in support of mask mandates on Monday, Sept. 13, for the Kenai Peninsula School Board meeting at Homer High School in Homer, Alaska. During a work session before the meeting, the district presented revisions to its COVID-19 mitigation protocols. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
School district revises COVID-19 mitigation plans

The revisions come as COVID-19 cases continue to surge in Alaska and on the Kenai Peninsula.

A protester stands outside the George A. Navarre Borough Admin building in Soldotna on Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021. (Camille Botello/Peninsula Clarion)
Parents square off over masks at school board meeting

Some parents said they will keep their kids home if masks are required, while others say they’ll keep their kids home if masks aren’t required.

.
Borough School Board election

On Tuesday, Oct. 5, elections will be held for Homer City Council,… Continue reading

.
Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly election

On Tuesday, Oct. 5, elections will be held for Homer City Council,… Continue reading

.
Homer City Council election

On Tuesday, Oct. 5, elections will be held for Homer City Council,… Continue reading

Janie Leask, a Homer resident, spoke in support of the new multi-use community center during Monday night’s city council meeting, stating the need for community recreation is vital.
Council moves forward with HERC plans

After years of discussions and planning, the Homer City Council is quickly… Continue reading

Most Read