“Pride is important to me because not only am I LGBTQ, but my whole family is. So it’s not supporting just the community and others around us … but also for my family to be supported and feel comfortable in our own skin.” 
                                 Sayora Van Reed

“Pride is important to me because not only am I LGBTQ, but my whole family is. So it’s not supporting just the community and others around us … but also for my family to be supported and feel comfortable in our own skin.” Sayora Van Reed

Faces of Homer Pride

Homer’s second Pride Walk and festivities on Saturday drew hundreds of unique Homer area residents to the streets to celebrate diversity and the LGBTQ+ community.

Participants marched from WKFL Park to Ocean Drive after gathering for speeches and music in the park. From there, people moved to Bishop’s Beach for a community potluck and bonfire.

The Homer News caught up with a few participants along the walk and asked each person, “What does Pride mean to you?”

Kaitlynn Dawsey

“Supporting people that don’t have a decision about their life.

Sayora Van Reed

“Pride is important to me because not only am I LGBTQ, but my whole family is. So it’s not supporting just the community and others around us … but also for my family to be supported and feel comfortable in our own skin.”

Sage Anderson

“Pride means that everybody should be able to love whoever they want, and it’s really nobody else’s business.”

Drew Wimmerstedt

“It’s always nice to be in a large group of people and have like — I can give back some of my comfortableness and make sure other people feel the same way I do in their own identities.”

Falcom Greear

“Pride means so much to me. … I’ve felt so comfortable being who I am in this town and I’m really, really, proud to see that everyone is the same way too.”

Mary Williams (Falcom’s grandmother)

“Pride means everybody should be treated equally, no matter what they are. What religion, what color — anything.”

Lisa Talbott, Homer United Methodist Church pastor

“Pride to me, as a clergyperson, means that we all remember and recognize that we are all beloved children of God. That we were all created in God’s image and are worth every right and respect of every other person. It’s a time to celebrate the beauty of diversity in our community.”

Jason Davis

“Celebration of equality. It used to be about demanding equality. Now it’s about celebrating it I think.”

Reach Megan Pacer at mpacer@homernews.com.

Sage Anderson

Sage Anderson

Drew Wimmerstedt

Drew Wimmerstedt

Falcom Greear

Falcom Greear

“Pride means everybody should be treated equally, no matter what they are. What religion, what color — anything.”
                                ^ Mary Williams

“Pride means everybody should be treated equally, no matter what they are. What religion, what color — anything.” ^ Mary Williams

“Pride to me, as a clergyperson, means that we all remember and recognize that we are all beloved children of God. That we were all created in God’s image and are worth every right and respect of every other person. It’s a time to celebrate the beauty of diversity in our community.” <strong></strong>
                                — Lisa Talbott, Homer United Methodist Church pastor >

“Pride to me, as a clergyperson, means that we all remember and recognize that we are all beloved children of God. That we were all created in God’s image and are worth every right and respect of every other person. It’s a time to celebrate the beauty of diversity in our community.” — Lisa Talbott, Homer United Methodist Church pastor >

“Celebration of equality. It used to be about demanding equality. Now it’s about celebrating it I think.”
                                 Jason Davis

“Celebration of equality. It used to be about demanding equality. Now it’s about celebrating it I think.” Jason Davis

Kaitlynn Dawsey

Kaitlynn Dawsey

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