Flood meeting set for Friday in Anchor Point


As a result of recent floods, Gov. San Parnell declared a state disaster for the Mat-Su and Kenai Peninsula boroughs. The declaration has activated the state’s public and individual assistance programs.

Representatives from the Kenai Peninsula Borough Office of Emergency Management, road service area and state of Alaska will discuss recent flood events, response and recovery plans at a southern Kenai Peninsula community meeting to be held at Chapman School in Anchor Point from 7-8 p.m. Friday.

Disaster assistance centers also are being opened throughout the peninsula by the state’s Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management in order to help residents use two disaster recovery programs. The deadline to apply for an individual family grant or temporary housing is Nov. 20. 

An assistance center will be located at the Anchor Point Fire Station Oct. 15-16, as well as one in Seward Oct. 15-17 and at the Borough’s Emergency Response Center in Soldotna on Oct. 18.

Individual family grants provide “recovery funds for physical property, like home and vehicle damages,” said Jeremy Zidek, Division of Emergency Management spokesperson.

The grant also provides money for medical, dental and funeral expenses — no one died during September’s flooding. The maximum grant a person or family can receive is $15,700. It is provided only when other resources, such as insurance and small business loans, are not adequate.

Temporary housing is used when residents’ homes are destroyed or severely damaged, Zidek said. Homeowners can receive a maximum of 18 months of assistance, and people who rent can receive three months of assistance.

The state is asking residents to bring the following items to the assistance centers: personal identification, insurance information, home ownership documents and a description of damages and losses. Photographs of damage also can be beneficial, said Zidek.

The Division of Emergency Management is working with the borough to calculate the expenses caused by the flooding. So far, emergency management officials have identified about 440 impacted homes.

The borough previously requested flooding-damage information from residents, which officials compiled. It is currently asking the Federal Emergency Management Agency for assistance with damage assessment. Beginning Thursday, state representatives and FEMA employees will visit areas that reported damages. That information will be used by the state to decide if it should request federal assistance.

Visiting one of the centers is the fastest way to apply for assistance. Residents also may call 1-855-445-7131 to apply by phone.

 

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