Homer charter captain gets 10 years for meth dealing to teens, child porn

A federal judge on Feb. 8 sentenced a Homer sport fishing charter captain to 10 years in prison for distributing methamphetamines and oxycodone to teenage girls and for possessing child pornography. Randall Hines, 34, also was sentenced by U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Burgess to 10 years supervised release and to register as a sex offender for 15 years.
Hines also is to fund a $160,000 trust fund that will help victims get drug treatment and counseling.
Hines earlier had pleaded guilty to a series of crimes that took place between 2009 and 2011. Owner of the charter boat Rebel, a 32-foot Bayweld, Hines admitted in a plea agreement that he gave drugs to a teenage girl and had sex with her starting before she turned 16. He also admitted having sex with other girls and gave them meth and oxycodone, including two other girls under 16. In all, he admitted to having sex with and providing drugs to six girls under 18. Hines also admitted to making a sexually explicit video on a cell phone of one girl under 18.
Hines also admitted urging three girls to falsely write letters saying he did not give them drugs or have sex with them. When family of one victim tried to get restraining orders against Hines, he coerced the girl to lie in a letter.
“Age and finesse” allowed Hines to manipulate girls who weren’t able “to discern or recognize the evilness of his ways,” one mother of a victim told the court.
At the sentencing, Burgess rejected a suggestion that Hines was a meth addict and thus not responsible for his crimes. “There was one adult in the room. One adult. And that was you!” Burgess said. “I don’t care if you were drunk. I don’t care if you were on methamphetamine or oxycodone.”
Assistant U.S. Attorney Kimberly Sayers-Fay prosecuted the case. Hines was arrested in August 2011. Hines was initially set for sentencing in November, but Burgess rejected an earlier plea agreement.
U.S. Attorney Karen Loeffler commended the persistence of the families in the case and the work of the FBI and the Anchorage Police Vice Unit as part of the Innocence Lost Task Force. The case began when Homer Police investigated a sexual abuse of a minor case. Homer Police Chief Mark Robl said that police then notified the FBI.
Michael Armstrong can be reached at michael.armstrong@homernews.com.

 

More in News

A diagram presented by Teresa Jacobson Gregory illustrates the proposed extension of the Beachcomber LLC gravel pit and the impact it may have on the surrounding state recreation area. The red markers indicate the current gravel mining area, and the orange represents the area the extension may allow for mining if approved. (Image courtesy of Teresa Jacobson Gregory)
KPB Assembly to consider gravel-pit ordinance revisions

Proposed gravel pit ordinance follows Superior Court ruling that planning commission can deny permits.

The Kenai Peninsula Borough School District Board of Education meets on Monday, Dec. 6, 2021 in Soldotna, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
School board works to highlight students’ voices

Within the first hour of the meeting students would have up to five minutes each to address the board about any issue

Furniture awaits use in a bedroom at a cold weather shelter set to open next month on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021 in Nikiski, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Half of beds at Nikiski shelter are occupied

The shelter opened at the end of December 2021

A group of community members gather together on Thursday, Jan. 6 at WKFL Park to protest the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on the one-year anniversary of the attack. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)
South Peninsula residents turn out to ‘defend democracy’

Members of the Homer community and the Unitarian Universalists of Homer gathered… Continue reading

This image available under the Creative Commons license shows the outline of the state of Alaska filled with the pattern of the state flag. The state on Thursday reported a modest population growth between April 2020 and July 2021. It's the first time since 2016 the state has reported a population increase. (
State reports small population growth

Net migration still negative, but not as negative.

COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)
Health officials: Some monoclonal treatments widely ineffective against omicron

The new guidance comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

State Sen. Peter Micciche fields questions from constituents during a joint chamber luncheon on Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2022 at the Kenai Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center in Kenai, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
State Senate president lays out vision for upcoming session

Micciche seeks path forward on budget, looks to pass legislation on fishing permits, alcohol regulations

Snow covers the sign on Thursday, Dec. 9, 2021, at the South Peninsula Hospital Bartlett Street COVID-19 testing and vaccination clinic in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Local COVID-19 alert rate quadruples

State alert level per 100,000 people now is above 1,100.

Most Read