Homer Electric Association is requesting a rate change in its quarterly filings with the Regulatory Commission of Alaska. In its

Pebble Limited Partnership’s lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency will continue as a federal judge denied the agency’s motion to dismiss June 4.

U.S. Alaska District Court Judge H. Russel Holland concluded that while the EPA may not have established the three “anti-mine” groups as described by Pebble in its complaint — the anti-mine coalition, scientists and assessment team — agency staff could have utilized them to draft the pending determination to block development of Pebble’s copper and gold claims near Bristol Bay.

The mining organization’s attorneys argued during a May 28 hearing that the agency was in cahoots with area tribes and mine opposition groups for years prior to and during the Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment process.

The exhaustive assessment, which found large-scale mining would irreparably harm the region’s robust salmon fisheries, is the basis for the EPA’s attempt to preemptively stop Pebble through its Clean Water Act Section 404(c) wetlands protection authority.

Pebble’s primary argument centers on the claim that the EPA violated the Federal Advisory Committee Act, or FACA, which requires agencies to remain objective and follow strict public notice and open meetings guidelines on policy issues when taking input from interest groups.

“We are convinced the EPA has pursued a biased process against our project that then drove their actions toward a predetermined outcome,” Pebble CEO Tom Collier said in a formal statement after the order. “Our fight with the EPA has been about a fair and transparent process for objectively evaluating a development plan for our project once we have presented it via the permitting process. In addition to this case, we are seeking documents to show the EPA’s lack of transparency and action under the Freedom of Information Act.”

 

More in News

Commercial fishing boats are rafted together in May 2016 in the harbor in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
States expands small business grants

The AK CARES Grant program is being modified in response to calls for changes.

Alaska Army National Guard soldiers use a CH-47 Chinook helicopter to remove an abandoned bus, popularized by the book and movie “Into the Wild,” out of its location in the Alaska backcountry. The state Department of Natural Resources said Thursday, July 30, that it intends to negotiate with the University of Alaska’s Museum of the North in Fairbanks to display the bus. (Sgt. Seth LaCount/Alaska National Guard via AP, File)
‘Into the Wild’ bus likely lands a new home

An infamous bus appears headed to a new home at a museum.

Homer Farmers Market: Farmers create diverse local food system

I had an inspiring conversation recently with Carolina Behe of the Inuit… Continue reading

Painted signs posted at the candlelight vigil held for Anesha “Duffy” Murnane on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, at WKFL Park in Homer, Alaska, affirm love for Murnane and beseech her safe return. (Photo by Delcenia Cosman)
Virtual birthday party to be held for missing Homer woman

A virtual birthday party is being held to honor a Homer woman… Continue reading

Homer City Hall. (Homer News file photo)
City council to vote on additional grant programs

The Homer City Council tweaked its program for relief grants for small… Continue reading

Homer City Hall. (Homer News file photo)
Filing period opens for Homer City Council, Mayor seats

The filing period for the local municipal election has opened, and interested… Continue reading

Rep. Gary Knopp is seen in this undated photo. (Photo courtesy Jayme Jones)
Lawmakers remember colleague killed in crash

State Rep. Gary Knopp, who represented Kenai-Soldotna area, was one of seven people killed Friday.

Sarah Vance poses for a photo on June 12, 2020, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Hannah Vance)
Sarah Vance runs for 2nd House of Representatives term

Rep. Sarah Vance (R-Homer) is making a run at a second term… Continue reading

Image via Kenai Peninsula Borough School District
KPBSD to require face coverings; Board OKs raise for school nurses

The increase in pay is set to expire at the end of 2020-2021 school year.

Most Read