Open house features state’s road projects

Pilot cars, new pavement, new striping. Homer’s seen it all this summer. And it isn’t over yet. 

The Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities is holding an open house from 4-7 p.m. Aug. 5 at Cowles Council Chambers to provide information on seven upcoming projects in the Homer area. Project designers and consultants will be available to answer questions on seven upcoming projects.

Sean Baski, a project manager for the department’s Central Region Highway Design Section in Anchorage, provided the following information on those projects.

Sterling Highway and North Fork Road overhead beacon

Carla Smith, project engineer

The project will install an overhead flashing beacon and signing to support a two-way stop at this Anchor Point intersection. Survey and design are in progress. Construction is anticipated for summer 2013.

Pioneer Avenue and Main Street overhead beacon
Carla Smith, project engineer.
This project will install an overhead flashing beacon and signing to support an all-way stop at this Homer intersection. Survey and design are in progress. Construction is anticipated for summer 2015.
Sterling Highway and Main Street intersection improvements
Carla Smith, project engineer

This project will upgrade the intersection, which currently lacks a signal, to a roundabout or a signal. Surveys and studies will begin this fall. Work for next year will consist of survey, traffic engineering, preliminary design and environmental document. The construction schedule depends on impacts to right-of-way, utilities and the environment.
Homer Lake Street rehabilitation
Sean Baski, project engineer
This project will rehabilitate Lake Street’s roadway pavement from the intersection with the Sterling Highway to the intersection with Pioneer Avenue and East End Road, widen the roadway to add bicycle facilities, improve pedestrian facilities and improve drainage including ditches and culverts. The project also includes, as necessary, dig-outs, utility relocations, signs, and striping. Construction is anticipated for the summer of 2016, but will depend on right-of-way acquisition. The overlay paving that occurred summer was performed by DOT&PF Maintenance and Operations as a stop-gap measure until this rehabilitation project is constructed.

Beluga floatplane facilities improvements
Jon Knowles, project engineer
The project provides a road connection between Beluga Lake and the Homer Airport to support floatplane and emergency boat access between the two facilities. Included is an access road, a turnaround area and a ramp into the lake.  Construction is anticipated for summer 2014, but may be moved to summer 2015.
Sterling Highway milepost 173-174 pavement preservation

Sean Baski, project engineer

This project resurfaces the Sterling Highway from Pioneer Avenue to Lake Street, south of Beluga Lake. It also includes, as necessary, improvements to curb ramps, guardrail, guardrail end treatments, guardrail delineation, dam safety inspection of the Sterling Highway embankment where it serves as a dam for Beluga Lake, dig-outs, drainage, signs, and striping. Construction is anticipated for summer 2014, but may be moved to summer 2015.
Sterling Highway milepost 174-179 pavement preservation
Sean Baski, project engineer
This project resurfaces the Sterling Highway from Pioneer Avenue to the end of the Homer Spit. It also includes, as necessary, improvements to curb ramps, guardrail, guardrail end treatments, guardrail delineation, dig-outs, drainage, signs, and striping. Construction is anticipated for summer 2014.
”We will provide handouts for additional projects in the Homer area, but staff familiar with those projects will not be available at the open house,” said Baski. “Contact information for comments and questions, however, will be provided on the handouts

McKibben Jackinsky can be reached at mckibben.jackinsky@homernews.com.

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