This screenshot from the Ravn Travel website details how Ravn Alaska’s public charter service works. (Screenshot image by Homer News)

This screenshot from the Ravn Travel website details how Ravn Alaska’s public charter service works. (Screenshot image by Homer News)

Ravn Alaska starts public charter service on Friday

Company is still waiting on final DOT approval

Ravn Alaska, the new iteration of the company that went bankrupt earlier this year due to the economic fallout of the novel coronavirus pandemic, is set to take customers in Homer off the ground again starting Friday — and the CEO says the company won’t be letting them down.

Tickets went on sale today, Thursday, for limited flights through Ravn Travel, operated by Corvus Airlines, Inc. Flights begin on Friday.

An important distinction, however, is that Ravn has not started regular air service back up again. The service Ravn is currently offering are public charter flights, CEO Rob McKinney explained.

The company is still waiting on its final approval from the U.S. Department of Transportation. The DOT had previously issued pending approval, which came with a 14-day pending period that was open to public comment. McKinney said two companies, competitors or potential competitors, commented in objection. That has slowed this final approval process down.

That’s when Ravn decided to take this alternate path to getting some level of service back to some Alaska communities, McKinney said. Ravn Travel will offer public charter service to Homer, Dutch Harbor/ Unalaska, Sand Point, Valdez and Kenai.

There are some limitations to the public charter flights — for example, Ravn is limited to a maximum of four round-trip flights per week. Flights will go directly from Homer to Anchorage and will not stop in Kenai, he said. According to Ravn Travel’s current schedule, flights between Homer and Anchorage will take place on Tuesday, Thursday, Friday and Sunday of each week.

Another limitation of public charter flights, McKinney said, is that Ravn can’t partner with any major airlines for the purposes of checking bags through.

The charter service being offered by Ravn Travel does not allow for code sharing, rewards programs or other benefits. Those are planned for the eventual full launch of Ravn Alaska.

McKinney said he’s been an eternal optimist about getting regular Ravn Alaska service back to communities, and that he’s hopeful that within the next week or so the final DOT approval will come through. Until then, the public charter flights are a way to begin serving at least some populations. Ravn Alaska also offers private charter flights.

“We are so excited,” McKinney said about being able to fly people again. “This has been a long time coming. The entire staff is just really rearing to go.”

McKinney said he’s deeply appreciative of all the community support Ravn has gotten throughout the process of starting back up.

All guests on Ravn flights will be required to wear face coverings, according to Gary Scott of Thompson & Co. PR, on behalf of Ravn.

For more information about pricing and flights, visit ravnalaska.com and ravntravel.com.

Reach Megan Pacer at mpacer@homernews.com.

More in News

The sign in front of the Homer Electric Association building in Kenai, Alaska as seen on April 1, 2020. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)
Candidate nomination deadline for HEA election approaches

Elections for the Homer Electric Association Board of Directors are coming up,… Continue reading

Commercial fishing and other boats are moored in the Homer Harbor in this file photo. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Seawatch: International Pacific Halibut Commission studying COVID-19 impacts on fishermen

Three surveys will look at financial impacts before and during the pandemic

The Pfizer vaccine for COVID-19 shortly after it arrived at the South Peninsula Hospital on Wednesday, Dec. 16, 2020 in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Megan Pacer/Homer News)
State opens next vaccination tier

More than 23% of peninsula residents have gotten first vaccine dose

Alaska state Sen. Lora Reinbold, an Eagle River Republican, holds a copy of the Alaska Constitution during a committee hearing on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2021, in Juneau, Alaska. Gov. Mike Dunleavy, a Republican, sent Reinbold a letter on Feb. 18, 2021, saying she has used her position to “misrepresent” the state’s COVID-19 response. Reinbold said the letter was “full of baseless accusations and complaints.” (AP Photo / Becky Bohrer)
Dunleavy says Reinbold misrepresents virus response

Dunleavy said his administration will no longer participate in hearings led by Sen. Lora Reinbold

Homer News file photo
Homer High School.
School announcements

School district risk level update and upcoming events

This undated photo shows a section of Deep Creek near Ninilchik, Alalska recently acquired by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game with the assistance of the Kachemak Heritage Land Trust to protect hunting and fishing in the area. (Photo courtesy of Kachemak Heritage Land Trust)
State, feds and land trust work together to acquire 93.5 acres for conservation

Oil spill trust fund used to buy fish habitat on valuable salmon stream

The entrance to the Homer Electric Association office is seen here in Kenai, Alaska on May 7, 2020. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)
HEA work at Stonehocker Creek presents challenges

HEA remediation work across the bay continues

Ben Dickson, November winner of the Homer Flex Phoenix Award. (Photo courtesy Beth Schneider/Homer Flex School)
November Homer Flex award winner announced

The November winner of the monthly student award given out by Homer… Continue reading

This undated map shows three wildlife enhancement projects on the southern Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, planned or done by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. (Map courtesy of Alaska Department of Fish and Game)
Three projects on southern Kenai Peninsula aim to benefit moose habitat

Cut willow bushes will regenerate into higher protein browse for moose

Most Read