In this Sept. 5, 2019, file photo, Meda DeWitt, left, Vic Fischer, middle, and Aaron Welterlen, leaders of an effort to recall Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy, lead about 50 volunteers in a march to the Alaska Division of Elections office in Anchorage, Alaska. The Alaska Supreme Court on Friday, Feb. 14, 2020 agreed to allow a group seeking to recall Gov. Mike Dunleavy to begin a second signature-gathering phase. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)

In this Sept. 5, 2019, file photo, Meda DeWitt, left, Vic Fischer, middle, and Aaron Welterlen, leaders of an effort to recall Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy, lead about 50 volunteers in a march to the Alaska Division of Elections office in Anchorage, Alaska. The Alaska Supreme Court on Friday, Feb. 14, 2020 agreed to allow a group seeking to recall Gov. Mike Dunleavy to begin a second signature-gathering phase. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, File)

Recall Dunleavy group gathering signatures for next phase of campaign

The recall group must gather 71,252 signatures.

The group organizing an effort to recall Gov. Mike Dunleavy is kicking off events across the state for the second round of required signatures.

The recall group is now in phase two of the process and must gather 71,252 signatures. When those signatures are collected an election or special election will be scheduled, during which Alaskans can vote whether or not they wish to recall the governor.

Earlier this month, the state Supreme Court allowed for the Recall Dunleavy group to begin the next phase of signature gathering.

Last week, Stand Tall With Mike, a group legally opposing the recall effort, dropped its court fight with the state Supreme Court saying “further participation would not be a productive use of its resources.”

In Alaska, grounds for recall are lack of fitness, incompetence, neglect of duties or corruption. Recall Dunleavy, which was fueled in part by deep budget cuts Dunleavy made last year, says the governor violated the constitution when he didn’t appoint a judge in the required time frame, misused state funds for partisan online ads and mailers and improperly used veto power to “attack the judiciary.”

Official petition booklets have been mailed out to communities around the state. This weekend there will be three major kickoff events in Anchorage, Fairbanks and Juneau.

In Soldotna, residents interested in signing the petition can visit conference room A of the Soldotna Library from 3:45 p.m. to 5:45 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 28, and 2 p.m. to 5:45 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 29. On Sunday, March 1 residents can sign the petition from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Everything Bagels in Soldotna.

In Homer, residents can find a petition to sign from noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 29 and then from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, March 2 through Sunday, March 8 at the log cabin in front of the property at 3756 Lake Street.

In Seward, there will be a petition to sign from noon to 4 p.m. on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 28 through March 1 at the Ranting Raven.

Recall supporters can visit the group’s website to find other locations to sign the petition, events and more information at recalldunleavy.org.

More in News

Alaska State Troopers logo.
Anchor Point house fire leaves one dead, one in serious condition

The cause of the fire is under investigation.

The Wrangell Institute was one of many residential schools in Alaska dedicated to involuntarily teaching the Indigenous people of the state European ways of living, forcibly breaking them from their own Alaska Native cultures. (Courtesy photo / National Park Service)
Churches respond to revelations about residential schools

That acknowledgement is taking a number of forms, varying by institution.

The entrance to the Mendenhall Glacier Recreation Area in the Tongass National Forest was covered in snow on Friday, Nov. 19, 2021, a day after federal authorities announced the next step in restoring the 2001 Roadless Rule on the forest. (Peter Segall / Juneau Empire)
Feds put freeze on Roadless Rule rollback

On the Roadless Rule again.

Commercial fishing and other boats are moored in the Homer Harbor in this file photo. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Seawatch: Historic sockeye run predicted for Bristol Bay

ADF&G says 2022 run could break this year’s record

A reader board sign on the Sterling Highway announces COVID-19 testing and vaccines at the South
No current COVID-19 patients at South Peninsula Hospital

Test rates, ER visits and admissions are dropping for Homer

Family practice physician Christina Tuomi, D.O., (right) gets Homer’s first dose of Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine from Emergency Department nurse Steve Hughes (left) on Thursday, Dec. 17, 2020 at South Peninsula Hospital in Homer, Alaska. Tuomi has been the hospital’s medical lead throughout the pandemic. (Photo courtesy Derotha Ferraro/South Peninsula Hospital)
Feds issue vaccine mandate to health care workers; Dunleavy joins lawsuit against the rule

Rule by CMS applies to hospitals, rural health clinics, community mental health centers.

Tim Navarre, president of the Kenai Peninsula Foundation, stands in a bedroom at a cold weather shelter set to open next month on Monday, Nov. 22, 2021 in Nikiski, Alaska. (Ashlyn O’Hara/Peninsula Clarion)
Shelter prepares to open doors

Efforts to establish a cold weather shelter on the peninsula have been in the works for years.

FILE - The Olympic rings stand atop a sign at the entrance to the Squaw Valley Ski Resort in Olympic Valley, Calif., on July 8, 2020. U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland on Friday, Nov. 19, 2021, declared "squaw" to be a derogatory term and said she is taking steps to remove the term from federal government use and to replace other derogatory place names. The popular California ski resort changed its name to Palisades Tahoe earlier this year. (AP Photo/Haven Daley, File)
Interior secretary seeks to rid U.S. of derogatory place names

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — U.S. Interior Secretary Deb Haaland on Friday formally declared… Continue reading

tease
Alaska man pleads not guilty to threatening 2 US senators

If convicted, he could face a maximum sentence of 50 years in prison.

Most Read