The filing deadline for the Alaska Permanent Fund dividend is March 31.

The filing deadline for the Alaska Permanent Fund dividend is March 31.

PFD deadline extended

The official deadline is 11:59 p.m., April 30.

The state has extended the deadline to file for Alaska Permanent Fund dividend checks to April 30.

More than half a million Alaskans have already filed for their dividend check. Applications were originally due March 31.

As of Tuesday night, 585,665 Alaskans had filed, according to data provided online by the Permanent Fund Dividend Division website. The official deadline is 11:59 p.m., April 30.

The Legislature passed their budgets over the weekend, which included a $1,000 PFD check to be paid in October. The budgets await the review of Gov. Mike Dunleavy.

Last year’s permanent fund dividend check was $1,606. In his proposed budget, Gov. Mike Dunleavy hoped for a check of about $3,000.

Since 1982, Alaskans have received a PFD check every year. The smallest payout was $331.29 in 1984. The highest was $2,072 in 2015, though, in 2008 the year’s $2,069 PFD check included an additional one-time payment of $1,200. A surplus of state natural resource revenues were distributed as the additional $1,200 when then Gov. Sarah Palin signed Senate Bill 4002.

Residents can file for their PFD online at pfd.alaska.gov/ or through a paper application, which must be mailed and postmarked by April 30. Supplemental documentation needed for the application is not required by April 30. Residents can mail in the documentation or wait to be contacted.

To be eligible for the PFD check, an applicant must have been an Alaska resident for an entire calendar year preceding the date they applied for a dividend and intend to stay in Alaska indefinitely. Applicants who wish to receive a PFD must also not claim residency in another state or country. Residents who are absent from Alaska for more than 180 days are also not eligible to receive a PFD check.

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