A small rubber duck rests in a puddle, welcoming customers on their way into The Bagel Shop, on Monday, Nov. 19, 2018 on East End Road in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Megan Pacer/Homer News)

A small rubber duck rests in a puddle, welcoming customers on their way into The Bagel Shop, on Monday, Nov. 19, 2018 on East End Road in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Megan Pacer/Homer News)

Best Bets

Are you ready for it, Homerites?

Are you ready for the question?

It’s that time of year when, inevitably among the turkey-and-gravy eating and football watching, each of us is accosted with that age-old question: What are you thankful for?

That is the namesake of the holiday, after all.

Putting aside the atrocious actions of Christopher Columbus when he encountered America’s first people — the version of events leading up to the holiday that are seldom told accurately within our happy holiday narrative — the actual Thanksgiving holiday itself can be a lovely celebration and a great reminder to give back and reflect on our privilege and good fortune.

Ideally, we would do this all the time. However, life does have a habit of getting in the way, so it’s nice to have a day dedicated to giving thanks.

And so, you can expect that question to come sometimes in the next two to four days, between helpings of pie and the less desirable but equally popular inquiries from your great aunt, like, “When are you getting married?” or “Still no children?”

In case you get a little stumped when asked what you’re thankful for this year, you are welcome to peruse the Bester’s personal list for inspiration:

Good health

Good health insurance (which is arguably harder to come by than good health)

Laughter

Pumpkin pie

Hoar frost gathering on the fence

Mashed sweet potatoes

True, kind friends

Apple pie

Heated blanket

Enthralling books

A wonderful job

Star Trek

Blueberry pie

Kachemak Bay

Coffee

All right, so maybe the average person won’t feel the need to list so many different kind of pie, but you get the picture. Big or seemingly insignificant, we all have a lot to be grateful for. It certainly never hurts for us to remember that.

You know what else never hurts? Taking a look at this week’s Best Bets:

BEST BETTER ROLL YOUR SLEEVES UP BET: Spend a relaxed afternoon making handmade holiday presents of soap. You will learn to make a basic reliable soap and have a choice of additives to make a custom soap bar just right for you. You will take your tray of soap home to cure, ready to cut and wrap for gifts in a few weeks, about 15 bars depending on the size you cut. You will also take home hand outs with a full explanation of the soap making process and additional recipes. This class costs $55 general and $51 for Homer Folk School members, and will be held from 1-5 p.m. Saturday at the Anam Cara Diamond Ridge Studio, at 66665 Fry Court in Homer.

BEST GET BETTER BET: Winter has taken her sweet, sweet time in getting here, but very soon lakes and ponds will be icing over, the perfect opportunity to show off your sweet moves on skates. Better get in some practice before that happens. Kevin Bell Arena holds open skate at 4 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday.

BEST BUILDING BET: Dreaming of your perfect home? On a tight budget? Thinking small but need room to grow? The Homer Folk School will host a class, “Owner Builder Home Design,” at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 28 at Anam Cara Diamond Ridge Studio, at 66665 Fry Court, Homer. The class will take you through essential aspects of good home design. Using her experience designing and building three houses, Nancy Lee-Evans will share 10 great ideas that will make your home more comfortable, convenient and able to grow intelligently. She will include sample floor plans to illustrate her ideas and you will also learn how to read a floorplan as you consider them. This class costs $25.

BEST BEAUTIFUL BET: Looking for something indoors? Head into the Homer Theatre next Thursday, Nov. 29, for a showing of the new film “Beautiful Boy,” hosted by Parent-To-Parent Support Group. Annie and Rob Wiard started and facilitate Parent-To-Parent Support Group to provide a place for parents and grandparents to find support and resources to better cope with their children/grandchildren suffering from addiction. The group is not affiliated with any organization. The screening costs $5 per ticket. There will be two showings at 5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m.

The halibut hook at the Homer Harbor has been wrapped in lights for the dark winter on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

The halibut hook at the Homer Harbor has been wrapped in lights for the dark winter on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

The halibut hook at the Homer Harbor has been wrapped in lights for the dark winter on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

The halibut hook at the Homer Harbor has been wrapped in lights for the dark winter on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Boats are moored in the Homer Harbor on a calm Saturday night on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Boats are moored in the Homer Harbor on a calm Saturday night on Nov. 17, 2018, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

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