Key figure in shaping state talks on Friday

The Kachemak Bay Campus’s history department invites the public to the book launch celebration for Vic Fischer’s new memoir, “To Russia With Love: An Alaskan’s Journey” at 7 p.m. Friday. The book, written with Charles Wohlforth, traces Fischer’s life from his early days in Germany and Russia to his decades in Alaska, where he was a delegate to the Alaska Constitutional Convention and a member of both the territorial and state Senates. Today, he continues to study state and local government policy and Alaska-Russia issues.
As a child of German parents associated with the Russian Revolution, Victor Fischer grew up in the shadow of Hitler and Stalin, watching his friends’ parents disappear after political arrests. Eleanor Roosevelt personally engineered the Fischer family’s escape from Russia. Victor Fischer served in the U.S. Army in World War II, fighting against his childhood friends in the Russian and German armies. As a young adult, he shaped Alaska’s map by planning towns throughout the state.
This unique autobiography recounts Fischer’s earliest days in Germany, Russia and Alaska, where he soon entered civic affairs and was elected as a delegate to the Alaska Constitutional Convention — the body responsible for establishing statehood in the territory. A move to Washington, D. C., and  some government appointments allowed him to witness key historic events of his era, which he also recounts in his book. Finally, Fischer brings his memoir up to the present, describing how he has returned to Russia many times to bring the lessons of Alaska freedom and prosperity to the newly democratic states.
His presentation and questions from the audience will be moderated by History professor Michael Hawfield. A book-signing will follow.

                                     

More in Community

Sara and Ed Berg retracing their daughter’s, Anesha “Duffy” Murnane, last known steps before disappearing two years ago on Oct. 17. The memorial walk is a way for the parents to keep her with them. “We don’t have anything left. This is one of the few things we have,” Sara Berg said. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)
Homer’s Best Bets

If a sudden influx of visitors shows up this month, credit yet… Continue reading

Town Crier

The Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities holds a virtual open… Continue reading

Willie (Photo courtesy of Alaska Mindful Paws)
Pet of the week: Willie

This big boy is full of love and spunk. Willie is a… Continue reading

The masthead for the Homer Weekly News.
Years Ago

Homer happenings from years past

Ward off Halloween’s mystical monsters with these garlic-infused cheesy shells and pepper sauce. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
On the strawberry patch: Tasty Halloween

Keep spooky creatures at bay with garlic-infused shells and pepper sauce.

For Carly Garay's "The Art of Ancestor Veneration," visitors are invited to include images, letters or prayers honoring ancestors at a central display. The exhibit shows through Oct. 30, 2021, at the Homer Council on the Arts in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Garay lifts the veil between living and dead with “Art of Ancestor Veneration”

HCOA show invites people to submit own images of ancestors at central altar.

Homer High School. (Homer News file photo)
School announcements

School district risk level update and upcoming events

Cabbage, potatoes, salmon and an assortment of pantry staples make for a culinary challenge. (Photo by Tressa Dale/Peninsula Clarion)
On the strawberry patch: Take a culinary pop quiz

Get creative with what’s in your pantry

Nick Varney
Unhinged Alaska: Sometimes I wonder, who needs who

Dog whispers we are not. Suckers for unconditional love, you bet.

Most Read