Clouds and smoke curl around the top of Augustine Volcano on Sunday, June 4, 2017 on Augustine Island, Alaska. The remote island in Cook Inlet is composed of little more than the volcano and its surrounding debris. (Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion, file)

Clouds and smoke curl around the top of Augustine Volcano on Sunday, June 4, 2017 on Augustine Island, Alaska. The remote island in Cook Inlet is composed of little more than the volcano and its surrounding debris. (Elizabeth Earl/Peninsula Clarion, file)

State seeks geothermal energy land nominations

The state is looking for takers to explore new energy — specifically, geothermal energy.

The Alaska Department of Natural Resources’ Division of Oil and Gas announced Wednesday, Aug. 15, that it’s looking for nominations of state lands with geothermal resources for a potential lease sale. Positioned at the northern edge of the Pacific plate, Southcentral Alaska and the Aleutian Islands are pockmarked with volcanoes and hot springs bubble up in the Interior.

While oil and gas extraction and hydroelectric energy generation are common in the state, there hasn’t been a successfully developed large-scale geothermal project yet.

One powerplant outside Fairbanks, a power plant in Chena Hot Springs Resort, opened in 2006 with a generating capacity of 400 kilowatts, according to an announcement from the Division of Oil and Gas on Wednesday.

The state has sold geothermal exploration leases before — the Alaska Energy Authority and Reno, Nevada-based renewable energy company Ormat Technologies explored on Mt. Spurr on the west side of Cook Inlet and sold one lease on volcanic Augustine Island in Kamishak Bay on the west side of Cook Inlet in 2013.

The Alaska Energy Authority partially funded the geothermal power plant at Chena Hot Springs as well, and indicated potential for other projects in Akutan and Nome, according to a 2016 fact sheet on the Alaska Energy Authority’s geothermal program.

People have been looking at potential geothermal resources in the state for more than a century — the first systematic description was published in 1917 and described 75 hot springs, according to the release from the Division of Oil and Gas.

“Investigations since the 1980s have shown nearly every region of Alaska has at least some geothermal resource potential,” the release states. “A 2012 report published by the Division of Geologic and Geophysical Surveys titled, Fossil Fuel and Geothermal Energy Sources for Local Use in Alaska, indicated that geothermal potential was most promising in the Aleutian Islands and Southeast Alaska.”

All state-owned, unencumbered lands south of the Umiat Baseline are eligible for the nomination, according to the release.

Based on the results, the state will decide whether to issue a best interest finding that would make lands available for lease. Nominations are open until Nov. 9 and documents are available at http://dog.dnr.alaska.gov/services/explorationlicensing.

Other volcanically active countries have tapped into geothermal significantly. Iceland draws about 25 percent of its total electricity production from geothermal power, according to the country’s National Energy Authority. In 2014, 85 percent of its primary energy use came from renewable energy resources, with about two thirds of that from geothermal.

Reach Elizabeth Earl at eearl@peninsulaclarion.com.

More in News

A member of the Gannet Glacier Type 2 Initial Attack Crew uses a drip torch during a burnout operation at the Swan Lake Fire on June 18, 2019. (Photo courtesy Alaska Division of Forestry)
Burn ban lifted — except on the Kenai

Ban will stay in effect on the peninsula due to recreational traffic associated with fishing season.

The Alaska Grown logo.
Homer Farmers Market: Market opens — with changes

The first Homer Farmers Market is coming up this weekend. This is… Continue reading

Two new COVID-19 cases for Kenai Peninsula

The Kenai Peninsula Borough has two new positive cases of COVID-19, according… Continue reading

Registered Nurse Cathy Davis (left) and Chief Nursing Officer Dawn Johnson (right) work at a table to get COVID-19 tests ready for the public Friday, May 29, 2020 at the Boat House Pavilion on the Homer Spit in Homer, Alaska. South Peninsula Hospital is now offering free COVID-19 testing for asymptomatic people with no appointments necessary at the Boat House Pavilion through June 6. (Photo by Megan Pacer/Homer News)
1 new COVID-19 case in Homer as hospital offers free testing on the Spit

Additional COVID-19 cases announced in Soldotna and in a nonresident visitor to the peninsula

COVID-19. (Image courtesy the CDC)
7 new cases of COVID-19 on Kenai Peninsula

5 of the new cases are on the southern peninsula, and Nikiski has its first case

COVID-19. (Image courtesy the CDC)
1 new COVID-19 case announced in Bethel area

One new case of COVID-19 was announced Wednesday, bringing the state’s total… Continue reading

COVID-19 impacting local fitness centers

In the small town of Homer, Alaska residents are finding ways to… Continue reading

Graduate Virginia Orth walks back to her car with her parents, April and David Orth, after receiving her diploma during the Connections Homeschool Class of 2020 graduation at Soldotna Elementary School in Soldotna, Alaska on May 21, 2020. (Photo by Brian Mazurek/Peninsula Clarion)
Making one last connection

Connections home-school students celebrate graduation together, at a distance

Kelly Cooper kicks off campaign in “Rally on the Bay”

Correction: This story has been corrected to note that Rep. Sarah Vance,… Continue reading

Most Read