Sara and Ed Berg retracing their daughter’s, Anesha “Duffy” Murnane, last known steps before disappearing two years ago on Oct. 17. The memorial walk is a way for the parents to keep her with them. “We don’t have anything left. This is one of the few things we have,” Sara Berg said. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)

Homer’s Best Bets

If a sudden influx of visitors shows up this month, credit yet another article in a big national paper proclaiming our virtues. This time, a… Continue reading

 

The sunrise shines on Mt. Redoubt Sunday, Oct. 10, creating hues of pinks, yellows and blues as it lights up the sky. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)

Homer’s Best Bets

“Always getting ready” goes a saying of the Yu’pik people of coastal western Alaska. That’s an ancient lesson we Alaskans can take to heart. Think… Continue reading

 

Golden-yellow birch trees and spruce frame a view of Aurora Lagoon and Portlock Glacier from a trail in the Cottonwood-Eastland Unit of Kachemak Bay State Park off East End Road on Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021, near Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong)

Homer’s Best Bets

Not that it was anything dramatic or anything, but whew, the election has ended and we can now return to our usual uncluttered highways absent… Continue reading

 

A family of trumpeteer swans feeds in Beluga Lake on Friday, Sept. 24, 2021, in Homer, Alaska. The gray swans, called cygnets, were born and raised this summer. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Homer’s Best Bets

Now is the time when Homer hovers in that ambiguous time of summer/not summer. OK, technically fall started last week on Sept. 22, so summer… Continue reading

A family of trumpeteer swans feeds in Beluga Lake on Friday, Sept. 24, 2021, in Homer, Alaska. The gray swans, called cygnets, were born and raised this summer. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
The beautiful weather last Saturday provided a clear view of Grewingk Glacier across Kachemak Bay from the Skyline Drive Overlook. (Photo by Sarah Knapp)

Homer’s Best Bets

The manic work going on at the Lake Street reconstruction project brought a taste of Los Angeles traffic to Homer this week. As crews laid… Continue reading

The beautiful weather last Saturday provided a clear view of Grewingk Glacier across Kachemak Bay from the Skyline Drive Overlook. (Photo by Sarah Knapp)
Recover, the 18th annual Burning Basket, starts to burn on Sunday, Sept. 12, 2021, at Mariner Park on the Homer Spit in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Best Bets

The Burning Basket has been transformed into heat and light. In fields around town, sandhill cranes gather for their migration. Fireweed has bloomed and its… Continue reading

Recover, the 18th annual Burning Basket, starts to burn on Sunday, Sept. 12, 2021, at Mariner Park on the Homer Spit in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
The Homer Mariner cheerleaders pep up the crowd during the Homer vs. Kodiak game Saturday, Aug. 28. The squad’s cheers could be heard by all as Homer won 34-0. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)

Homer’s Best Bets

In some parts of the country, workers celebrate Monday as Labor Day. Here at Latitude 59 degrees and some change, where many of us work… Continue reading

The Homer Mariner cheerleaders pep up the crowd during the Homer vs. Kodiak game Saturday, Aug. 28. The squad’s cheers could be heard by all as Homer won 34-0. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)
Emergency responders participate in a mass casualty emergency drill at Homer Airport on Tuesday, Aug. 24. The responders were responsible for recovering victims from a mock plane crash, triaging and transporting them to medical facilities. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)

Homer’s Best Bets

The fireweed might be going to fluff, but we still have a few more weeks of warmth and sunshine to enjoy this fabulous town and… Continue reading

Emergency responders participate in a mass casualty emergency drill at Homer Airport on Tuesday, Aug. 24. The responders were responsible for recovering victims from a mock plane crash, triaging and transporting them to medical facilities. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)
A mother encourages her daughter as they walked into Paul Banks Elementary School for the first day of classes. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)

Best Bets

The fireweed has bloomed to its tips and the petals have slowly started to peel away. This morning dew appeared on the Betster’s car, and… Continue reading

A mother encourages her daughter as they walked into Paul Banks Elementary School for the first day of classes. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)
Black-legged kittiwakes neast on Gull Island on July 31, 2021, near Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Best Bets

It might be somewhat damp these days, eh? Seasoned Homerites know that the rain always come before school starts so our kiddos won’t despair about… Continue reading

Black-legged kittiwakes neast on Gull Island on July 31, 2021, near Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Homer’s Bishop’s Beach Park was the location for an enactment of public participatory art on Sunday, Aug. 1, 2021, in Homer, Alaska. A ground design of colored fabric was created to convey a message of “Alaska United,” “Teamwork Makes the Dream Work” and “Thank You Water Protectors.” The public was invited to be part of the art by standing and sitting around the central design. Salmon sculptures, raven and sandhill crane puppets, Alaska flags and colored bandanas were an added touch to the overhead image depicting salmon solidarity.  The project was led by Mavis Muller and was the finale to her series of 12 annual aerial group photos for the protection of Alaska’s Bristol Bay. Photographer Russell Campbell captured the photo from a bucket lift at 35 feet high.
“Art is communication. With our creativity and imagination we can inspire new possibilities, and we can have fun doing it,” Muller said. (Photograph by Russell Campbell)

Best Bets

A friend calls the end of the tourist season “Augusts,” as in “Oh boy, it’s been a long day. There sure have been a lot… Continue reading

Homer’s Bishop’s Beach Park was the location for an enactment of public participatory art on Sunday, Aug. 1, 2021, in Homer, Alaska. A ground design of colored fabric was created to convey a message of “Alaska United,” “Teamwork Makes the Dream Work” and “Thank You Water Protectors.” The public was invited to be part of the art by standing and sitting around the central design. Salmon sculptures, raven and sandhill crane puppets, Alaska flags and colored bandanas were an added touch to the overhead image depicting salmon solidarity.  The project was led by Mavis Muller and was the finale to her series of 12 annual aerial group photos for the protection of Alaska’s Bristol Bay. Photographer Russell Campbell captured the photo from a bucket lift at 35 feet high.
“Art is communication. With our creativity and imagination we can inspire new possibilities, and we can have fun doing it,” Muller said. (Photograph by Russell Campbell)
A cow moose and her two calves feed on alder bushes on Thursday, July 21, 2021, in the Homer News parking lot in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Homer’s Best Bets

Just because August starts Sunday doesn’t mean summer has ended yet. There’s still lots to do, like these best bets: BEST HUMAN MOSAIC BET: Homerites… Continue reading

A cow moose and her two calves feed on alder bushes on Thursday, July 21, 2021, in the Homer News parking lot in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Peonies used at Alaska Perfect Peony Farm to create bouquets for the tour group on July 9. Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News
The second annual Homer Peony Celebration continues through July 24 with peony farm tours, art workshops, parties and peony bouquet sales! The Rotary Club of Homer-Kachemak Bay and Alaska Beauty Peony Co-op are also extending the peony bouquet sale at the Homer Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center for an additional weekend, including July 29-31. The bouquets are $20 and can be purchased from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 22-24 and 29-31. For more information or to view the full schedule events, visit www.homeralaska.org/homer-peony-celebration/.

Best Bets

Admit it, Betster persons. You’re kinda glad it rained this week. We Alaskans just can’t take hot temperatures. Last week left many of us gasping… Continue reading

Peonies used at Alaska Perfect Peony Farm to create bouquets for the tour group on July 9. Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News
The second annual Homer Peony Celebration continues through July 24 with peony farm tours, art workshops, parties and peony bouquet sales! The Rotary Club of Homer-Kachemak Bay and Alaska Beauty Peony Co-op are also extending the peony bouquet sale at the Homer Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center for an additional weekend, including July 29-31. The bouquets are $20 and can be purchased from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. July 22-24 and 29-31. For more information or to view the full schedule events, visit www.homeralaska.org/homer-peony-celebration/.
The Yale University Whiffenpoofs perform in a concert Thursday, July 8, 2021, at the Boathouse Pavillion in Homer, Alaska. The group also did a workshop Thursday at the Homer Council on the Arts. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Best Bets

Up at Chez Betster in the hinterlands of Homer, it’s been cold dark 30 the best week — so chilly that the heater kicks in… Continue reading

The Yale University Whiffenpoofs perform in a concert Thursday, July 8, 2021, at the Boathouse Pavillion in Homer, Alaska. The group also did a workshop Thursday at the Homer Council on the Arts. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
The Homer Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center hosted a grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new Homer Spit Visitor Information Center July 1. The office, located near Ramp 4 on the Homer Spit, will be open Thursdays through Sundays, July 1-Sept. 5 to offer information about Homer to visitors. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)

Homer’s Best Bets

The weather may be scattered with some rain this weekend, but the sun should come out on Sunday, bringing fun outings and exploration for all.… Continue reading

The Homer Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center hosted a grand opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new Homer Spit Visitor Information Center July 1. The office, located near Ramp 4 on the Homer Spit, will be open Thursdays through Sundays, July 1-Sept. 5 to offer information about Homer to visitors. (Photo by Sarah Knapp/Homer News)
People line up at food trucks and trailers on Saturday, June 19, 2021, at the Kevin Bell Ice Arena parking lot on the Homer Spit in Homer, Alaska. Part of the Homer Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center's Food Fest last week, the two-day food truck event drew a steady crowd. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Homer’s Best Bets

The Solstice might be over, but we still have 18 hours and 42 minutes of daylight, which ought to be enough to get out and… Continue reading

People line up at food trucks and trailers on Saturday, June 19, 2021, at the Kevin Bell Ice Arena parking lot on the Homer Spit in Homer, Alaska. Part of the Homer Chamber of Commerce and Visitor Center's Food Fest last week, the two-day food truck event drew a steady crowd. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
Children help create art with the projectile painting booth on Saturday, June 5, 2021, for Mary Epperson Day at the Homer Council on the Arts in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News0

Best Bets

Holy ultraviolet, has this been an awesome June or what? Any time you can get at least one weekend day of solid sunshine is a… Continue reading

Children help create art with the projectile painting booth on Saturday, June 5, 2021, for Mary Epperson Day at the Homer Council on the Arts in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News0
Poot Peak looms over visitors to the Homer Spit on Saturday, May 29, 2021, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Best Bets

Now we’re talking summer, Betster persons. There’s so much to do that yours truly will shut up and cut to the chase with these Best… Continue reading

Poot Peak looms over visitors to the Homer Spit on Saturday, May 29, 2021, in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
The Homer Spit and the Kenai Mountains catch the afternoon sunshine of Monday, May 17, 2021, as seen from West Hill in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Best Bet

The awesome weather we’ve been having this past week has done wonders to ease a lot of the anxiety and stress of the past winter.… Continue reading

The Homer Spit and the Kenai Mountains catch the afternoon sunshine of Monday, May 17, 2021, as seen from West Hill in Homer, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
An atmoshpheric phenomena called STEVE — for "Sudden Thermal Emission from Velocity Enhancement" — is seen in the southern sky early on Saturday, April 17, 2021, from Diamond Ridge near Homer, Alaska. The STEVE appeared the same night as a strong display of auroras to the north. Don Hampton, a research associate and faculty member at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, said STEVEs are not auroras, but a stream of charged particles or sub-aurora polarization streams.
"It's actually primarily a different phenomena or mechanism that is creating light," Hampton said of STEVEs.
A STEVE is more of a broadband emission than an aurora and can be distinguished by its color of light. Auroras tend to be green or vivid red, while a STEVE appears white to the human eye and may have tinges of red. Hampton said scientists knew about streams of charged particles that are not auroras, but hadn't thought to look if there's an optical phenomena associated with.
Aurora chasers in Canada first noticed the optical phenomena in 2014, and it was named by Chris Ratzlaff as a joke reference to the film "Over the Hedge," where the animals called the hedge "Steve." NASA scientist Elizabeth Macdonald came up with the description.
"It's pretty cool," Hampton said. "The whole history of the STEVE is that it's a citizen scientist discovery."
(Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Best Bets

In the long haul toward spring, even though winter might be hanging on with all its might, light and warmth persevere. It’s a matter of… Continue reading

An atmoshpheric phenomena called STEVE — for "Sudden Thermal Emission from Velocity Enhancement" — is seen in the southern sky early on Saturday, April 17, 2021, from Diamond Ridge near Homer, Alaska. The STEVE appeared the same night as a strong display of auroras to the north. Don Hampton, a research associate and faculty member at the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, said STEVEs are not auroras, but a stream of charged particles or sub-aurora polarization streams.
"It's actually primarily a different phenomena or mechanism that is creating light," Hampton said of STEVEs.
A STEVE is more of a broadband emission than an aurora and can be distinguished by its color of light. Auroras tend to be green or vivid red, while a STEVE appears white to the human eye and may have tinges of red. Hampton said scientists knew about streams of charged particles that are not auroras, but hadn't thought to look if there's an optical phenomena associated with.
Aurora chasers in Canada first noticed the optical phenomena in 2014, and it was named by Chris Ratzlaff as a joke reference to the film "Over the Hedge," where the animals called the hedge "Steve." NASA scientist Elizabeth Macdonald came up with the description.
"It's pretty cool," Hampton said. "The whole history of the STEVE is that it's a citizen scientist discovery."
(Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)
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