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Homer Farmers Market: Choice abounds in colors, varieties

I’m lazy — I admit it. It is so seldom that I actually make it to the Homer Farmers Market right at 10 a.m. anymore. But this last weekend I had some task that needed to be done at the market before opening. It was fairly amazing to watch the setup and hold myself back.

Being lazy means that I never get to see all of that early morning abundance when the farmers are first loading up their stalls. Hand over fist, they pull out each bunch and bundle, carry over each tote and basket. It was stunning to see all of the colors, all of the options, all of the varieties.

There are temptations everywhere. Carrots are scattered throughout all of the booths as well as fresh eggs and the most popular vegetables. Certain places like Rick Stefen’s booth truly amplify the concept of color. He had yellow beans and purple beans and green beans as well as every color of root crop you can imagine lined up like rainbows. Dan and Luba’s potatoes aren’t flashy, but new potatoes are always shy with the different colors they hide inside. The bright tomatoes at Coyote Run Farm tantalize with their size and shine.

And all the greens and herbs and micro greens that you see creating the feeling of lush jungle all throughout the market? They are simply satisfied with tempting you with their hidden flavors. And all the mushrooms? They tempt you with the promise that they will disappear soon. And the krauts and kimchi varieties? They tempt you with the promise that they are long lasting.

The seasons change regularly. Producers are adapting regularly. It’s tempting to just take advantage of that moment thoughtlessly. So it was heartwarming to see customers adapting as well on this lush and colorful morning — adapting to the new COVID-19 numbers and by wearing lush, colorful masks so everyone could feel safe at the market. It’s a great place to see community working together.

So come on down to the market this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. or Wednesday from 2-5 p.m. and grab up some of the lush, flavorful color for yourself.

Kyra Wagner is the coordinator of Sustainable Homer and the Homer Farmers Market’s biggest fan.

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