Point of View

Got drugs? Lots of reasons to safely dispose of old meds

Lurking in medicine cabinets and jumbled bathroom drawers, unused and expired pharmaceuticals are a common item in today’s households. 

Pharmaceuticals encompass a range of familiar items such as prescription and over-the-counter drugs, veterinary medicines, personal care products, fragrances and vitamins. While beneficial to humans when used properly, accumulations of pharmaceutical waste and improper disposal methods raise valid concerns for the safety of our loved ones and the environment.

Time to say goodbye to Homer; different life calls

As was the case for so many of us, I came to Homer on a whim, and stayed. That summer of 1992, it was a tenting-in-the-rain routine on Ohlson Mountain. All the years since have been equally engaging; nothing to disappoint.  My gratitude goes wholeheartedly to the countless, magnificent friends, patients, students, colleagues, community members and housesit critters. My appreciation for each of you is beyond words. 

Ferry system wants to serve state well

This summer has been a challenge for many Alaskans who rely on a particular link in the Alaska Marine Highway System. The M/V Tustumena has been out of service all summer, causing serious disruptions for residents and small businesses of Seldovia, Kodiak Island and the Aleutian Chain. 

The Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, DOT&PF, is committed to returning the Tustumena to service as quickly and safely as possible.

Extremists holding U.S. hostage

As someone who fashions himself a natural born anthropologist, my goodness, in the current affairs of our culture, these appear to be the most grave and serious times. Our penchant, anymore, for cultural suicide, of which founding father, John Adams, pessimistically forewarned, seems, sadly, to be bearing out before our very eyes.

People, not programs, make the difference

Like many residents of the Lower Kenai Peninsula, I have sat in disbelieving anguish, as I read or talked with community members regarding the party last fall that left a young man victimized by his peers.  

Recently Michael Armstrong of the Homer News wrote a piece asking the question: Is our community better off a year later? His question is a valid one; however the answers he found left me even more concerned. 

Free to choose: Will voters choose freedom on Oct. 1?

The water was tranquil, with hardly a ripple as far as the eye could see. 

Dad had gone around the corner in the boat while the rest of us stayed on the long gray gravel beach. He returned a short while later with the floating dock from our cabin in tow. He anchored it off shore about 20 feet. From it, my brother and cousins and I could use it as a diving platform into the icy clear waters.

What others say:

Here, in the Juneau Empire newsroom, we all remember where we were 12 years ago when the World Trade Center was attacked.

Some were trudging across a college campus, only to find their classes empty and classmates huddled around television screens. Others were roused early out of bed, then off to work having to cover the incident in their own newsrooms. Many remember the exact moments of that day, what clothes they wore, how information unfolded and how the images on the television looked more like Hollywood fantasy than reality.

City needs to know residents value community recreation, want home and support for it

Did you notice? The city’s wish list has a gaping hole. For the last four years a Homer Education and Recreational Center has made it onto Homer’s Capital Improvements Projects list. Where is it this year? What are we doing about this? 

When speaking to Homer City Council members and city employees, they somewhat agree. Their response is that they have not heard from the people of Homer, the citizens who live here. 

Dear Alaska and Homer

We almost moved out of Alaska. This would make us part of “The Leavers.” You know, the super close friends that become like family. They move away and take a gigantic piece of your heart with them. The ones you think of during dark February nights, the ones you wish you could join across the bay for a hike, the ones you miss. 

We question The Leavers. Was it the winter? Too hard to make a living? Aging family? Some reasons we understand, others we judge. Winter — ha, learn to ski. 

Governor needs to do right by Alaska’s salmon habitat

Last week, the Parnell Administration ruled a wild salmon stream in Cook Inlet was “suitable” for large-scale coal strip mining.

You read that right. In response to a petition from local Alaskans looking to protect salmon habitat from the proposed Chuitna coal strip mine, the Parnell Administration said “no.” This wasn’t an attempt to stop the coal mine; it simply asked the governor to prevent mining through salmon streams. For most Alaskans, that’s a no-brainer.

You can help write next chapter in Pratt’s story

I am honored to be a member of the board of directors and part of the exciting work we are doing to write the next chapter in the Pratt Museum’s story. I want to share this exciting work with you today.

Imagine a dedicated gathering space to share stories and learn from each other.

Imagine a place where a person in a wheelchair will find no barriers.

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