High school summer interns for U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski are, from left, Corey Hester, Kelsey Cunningham, Thaddeus Isaacs, Madeleine Moore, Connor Hula, Sen. Murkowski, John Gutsch, Maggie Graham, Mitchell Forbes, Rachell Gulanes, Emelia Van Whye, Kenzie Bjerken and Ayla O’Scannell.-Photo provided

High school summer interns for U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski are, from left, Corey Hester, Kelsey Cunningham, Thaddeus Isaacs, Madeleine Moore, Connor Hula, Sen. Murkowski, John Gutsch, Maggie Graham, Mitchell Forbes, Rachell Gulanes, Emelia Van Whye, Kenzie Bjerken and Ayla O’Scannell.-Photo provided

Homer High graduate serves as Murkowski summer intern

WASHINGTON, D.C.  — A recent Homer High School graduate is among the second group of summer interns working in the office of U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski.

Maggie Graham of Homer is one of 10 students from across Alaska who will observe and participate in the daily operations of the U.S. Senate and witness the legislative process. The students will spend the next four weeks assisting in the day-to-day clerical and administrative tasks such as directing mail, speaking with constituents and assisting staff with research projects.

Sen. Murkowski’s D.C. office is the only U.S. Senate office on Capitol Hill to bring on newly graduated high school students for full-time help, according to a press release from her office.

In addition to Graham, the second session of summer interns includes Mitchell Forbes of Bethel; Rachell Gulanes of Dutch Harbor; Emelia Van Wyhe of Copper Center; Kenzie Bjerken of Palmer; Thaddeus Isaacs of Klawock; Connor Hula of Eagle River; Kelsey Cunningham of Hope; and John Gutsch and Madeline Moore of Anchorage.

“These young Alaskans arrive in Washington, D.C. full of energy and enthusiasm to participate in the work of the Senate first hand,” Murkowski said. “I know that they have studied about the legislative process in class, and my staff and I look forward to watching them learn it by participating in it.  My staff and I both really enjoy having interns in my office, and we greatly appreciate their contributions and unique perspectives.”

In addition to their work in the office, each day Murkowski invites two interns to personally “shadow” her as she attends various meetings, hearings and votes.

The opportunity provides an up close and personal perspective to the duties of a U.S Senator.

This summer, Murkowski also has welcomed six Alaskans as college interns to serve in both Washington, D.C. and Alaska. Ayla O’Scannel, Corey Hester and Chelsea Thompson of Anchorage and Corey Mulder of Juneau will work in the Washington, D.C. office. Cale Clingenpeel of Anchorage and Bryant Hopkins of Fairbanks will both work in Murkowski’s state offices in their respective hometowns.

 

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