Letters

Letters

What do we tell our kids?

When is enough enough? The President lies to us every day. He mocks the disabled. He degrades women. He attacks anyone who’s not white to scare and divide us. He spits on the rule of law. He coddles Putin. He berates military families. Our White House is a moral cesspool. Senators Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan are disgraceful and complicit in their silence. Where is our decency? What are our values? What do we tell our kids?

Bob Shavelson

Foundation supports intern program

The Pratt Museum would like to thank the Homer Foundation for supporting our high school intern program this summer. The museum’s award-winning High School Intern program was funded this year with support from the David & Mary Schroer and KLEPS Funds, donor advised funds of the Homer Foundation.

This support of the museum and its Education Program helps provide the opportunity for a high-school intern to join the museum’s team for a summer of museum work. This summer, intern extraordinaire Zoe Cramer was provided with unique opportunities for hands-on, exhibit and field-based experiences, including master naturalist training, a collecting trip for aquaria specimens, public engagement and co-teaching a Discovery Lab with Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. She worked closely with the education director and other professionals from the Pratt Museum, as well as Center for Alaskan Coastal Studies, Alaska Islands and Ocean Visitor Center, Kachemak Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve and several other museum partners.

“Talking to and educating people has made me want to study ecology, anthropology, or both in order to help people understand the world in a more holistic and a more thoughtful way,” Zoe Cramer said. “In a more inclusive sense I want to become a teacher and allow people to connect with topics in a personal and interactive way. That’s just scratching the surface.”

Financial investment in the Pratt’s High School Internship Program has provided unparalleled opportunities to young interns in the Homer area for more than 15 years.

Sincerely,

Laurie Stuart, Pratt Museum Executive Director

Seaton is wise, time-tested statesman

My deceased conservative Republican father had an Abraham Lincoln picture on his desk and this quote from him: “I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true. I am not bound to succeed but I am bound to live up to what light I have. I must stand by anybody that stands right,stand with him while he is right and part with him when he goes wrong.”

“But Daddy,” I asked, “Aren’t you supposed to be a friend even when your friend makes mistakes?”

“Friend, yes,” Dad said, “but you don’t go down his wrong path with him. If you stay strong in the light, you can often be a better friend further down the path.”

Dad liked the Republican Party, back then. They encouraged all to think for themselves rather than being pack animals blindly following the leader. Consider this: Paul Seaton is a courageous, wise, time-tested statesman who knows and studies

the issues. He takes his job seriously. We can’t afford to lose a gem like that. Think. Vote.

Martha Ellen Anderson

Remember Overdose Awareness Day

In 2017, an estimated 72,000 people died from drug overdose. Of those people, 127 were Alaska residents. Many Alaskan parents will never see their children get married and many Alaskan children will never introduce their spouse to their parents. This epidemic is devastating our nation and state.

Every year on International Overdose Awareness Day we educate our community on safety to help prevent the event of an overdose and help save lives. International Overdose Awareness Day is this Friday, August 31 and thousands of individuals and impacted family members will combat addiction by providing harm reduction techniques and education on how to revive someone from an overdose to their community.

I just wanted to teach crochet in the prison and to visit those in prison, what transpired was a whole different story. I began to see these women as someone just like me, mothers wanting the best for their children, wanting to make a difference in other people’s lives. But along the way in life, they encountered a drug that changed the very fabric of their being. It changed the pathways in their brains! I used drugs in my youth, but never heroin or opioids. And I never got caught.

Sitting around a metal table devoid of any comforts of home crocheting, the talk turns to kids and the stories and the few cherished pictures come out. They want to change, to have their children with them again and to be good mothers. The treatment beds are full in facilities and safe escorts upon release to safe houses are not readily available.

I am now advocating on behalf of those women in hopes of implementing better treatment and education in the prison. Substance abuse education includes harm reduction techniques, which are especially important to learn as overdose awareness day approaches.

These techniques can help save lives by providing survival and safety rules of using opioids. Safety rules are to never use alone and do not use at the same time as your friend – wait 30 minutes. In case of an overdose, the other person will be able to assist either by calling for help or using naloxone; which one should always carry. Naloxone is the life saving overdose reversal drug which can be injected or sprayed into the nostrils.

This overdose awareness day join your community in opioid education, prevention techniques, and survival and safety rules. Make sure you are prepared in case a loved struggles with addiction or has an overdose.

Ardith Mumma

Make the world less cruel

I can’t think of a time when conservatives have endured life threatening prejudices in this “free” country of ours. I think of conservatives as having been in power, enslaving people, discriminating against minorities, newcomers, other religions, or anyone different from themselves.

When applied to politics, “conservative” is a meaningless word. Whatever they were trying to conserve before isn’t being conserved now. Conservatives are saying we are a Christian country, but money is God at the cost of our environment and health. They are not “conserving” our monuments or sacred spaces, or leaving places unpolluted for future generations. Nothing is sacred in the name of the money God. All is open for our use and abuse.

If we pollute our environment, we pollute ourselves. Eat Round Up and see how you feel. Science without humanity.

Conservatives are offended by homosexuals. How do you know that homosexuals aren’t God’s answer to overpopulation? Who are you to judge? These people have been killed for being who they are. By touting your disapproval, you cause this. You may think they have a choice, but they don’t think so, and what if it’s just their preference? Shouldn’t people be able to love who they want? Contrary to popular belief, gays are not ruining your marriage.

The mayor’s proclamation was intended to help them not live in fear, that we accept all law abiding citizens into our community.

People who feel justified in hurting or killing others who belong to some group should be jailed as a menace to society.

What makes this country great is the “ideal” of freedom which we strive for where people of different cultures and races come for peace and security.

Our country will be greater when all can live in peace here. This world is cruel. We need to make it less cruel.

Lela Ryterski

Swimmers appreciate lessons

Kachemak Swim Club coach, Thad Gunther and his staff along with pool manager, Bridget Kuhns, deserve a huge shout out for an outstanding summer of swim lessons. Their professionalism, knowledge, enthusiasm and general awesomeness was not to be topped. Our grandkids went from the tot dock to swimming strokes independently and the growth we observed in other swimmers was equally impressive. Because swim lessons were so fun and the staff was always so great to be around, our grandkids begged to swim twice a day most days.

Three punchcards later I can tell you that Thad, Bridget and their respective staff are the biggest champions of every single child learning to swim and enjoying a positive experience at the pool. Oh and many of the staff were our local high school swim stars who arrived early at the pool for their workout and stayed all morning for session after session of swim lessons with a smile on their face. It was impressive and heart-warming to see our community work at it’s best for its youth. Thank you Thad, Bridget, Tirzah, Rebecca, Ella, Adeline, Clayton, Madison, Kira, Eli, and Alia for an outstanding summer in the pool.

Saundra Hudson

America’s slide toward socialism

We Americans are seeing a lot of interest in what is called “socialism,” where the government offers and supplies most all of our wants and needs, such as education, even at the college level, health costs, food, rent and other living expenses. For those who think this is the best way for our nation, state and town to go, I suggest you book a trip to our neighboring country Venezuela to get a good look at the result of socialism.

As little as 10 years ago it was the most prosperous nation in South America. Today, because of adopting the socialistic form of government, it has become the poorest in our hemisphere.

Inflation soars at many thousands percent. Industry, being controlled by the government, has all but disappeared, many thousands are unemployed, starvation is rampant, crime is out of control, and people have emigrated to neighboring countries by the tens of thousands. Nobody is crossing their border to get into the country.

Just take a look in your computer to see much more of the devastating results and ask yourself if this is what you who have a socialist bent might want for our free republic. Consider some of this before you cast your next ballot.

Floyd Seekins

Runners give thanks for supporting cystic fibrosis and Lost Lake Run

End of the Road Runners would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to all of our incredible sponsors for their generous support of the Lost Lake Run and cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a life-threatening genetic disease that primarily affects the lungs and digestive system. An estimated 30,000 children and adults in the United States (70,000 worldwide) have CF.

Thanks to donations from our sponsors and other individuals and businesses, Lost Lake 2017 raised over $285,000. These funds go directly to supporting research towards future treatments for C.F. and to changing the lives of people in Alaska, including Gov. Bill Walker’s daughter-in-law and even a beautiful baby right here in Homer.

One of the traditions of the run is that every mile marker features a photo and a biography of a child battling cystic fibrosis. Their stories serve to inspire runners through the tough, 16-mile alpine course, and also put into perspective what courage in the face of real challenge is all about. Please join us in thanking theses generous sponsors for making 2018 one of the most successful fundraising year in the 27-year history of the Lost Lake Race: Alibi Bar and Grill, Best Western Bidarka Inn and Mako’s Water Taxi.

Sincerely,

End of the Road Runners: Derek Bynagle, Jen Booz, Kenny Daher, Lila Johnson, Nicole McKenney, Kim Powell, Martin Schuster and Erika Thompson

Scholarship helped with v-ball camp

A few months ago I was honored with the Alice Witte Memorial Scholarship Fund at the Homer foundation for a volleyball camp. The grant led me to an excellent volleyball Nike camp in Santa Cruz, California where I learned new skills as well as improved old ones. It was with out a doubt, the

highlight of my whole summer! It made me realize how great of

an opportunity I had been given and how I hope that others will also share my experience. I would like to deeply thank the Homer Foundation for the chance to learn, play and improve under talented college athletes.

Sincerely, Laura lnama

‘Voices for Freedom’ story was false

On Sunday, 26 August, a local radio station from Homer aired a story in their “Voices for Freedom” segment concerning transgender (TG) issues. It was so replete with misinformation that it is hardly worth mentioning. However, it can be used as an example of how an individual can use radio or newsprint time to purvey absolutely false information.

The basis for this author’s information is the story of a physician from Johns Hopkins University who promoted the idea that transgender individuals have a psychological problem as opposed to a genetic or biologic problem. Because of his beliefs, a clinic at Hopkins was closed. The year was 1975 and no mention was made of this by the author of the story.

Fast forward to modern times and we note that Dr. McHugh’s theories have been totally debunked as “balderbash.” Indeed, as of today, Johns Hopkins hosts one of the largest clinics in the country for TG individuals. The clinic is composed of professionals across the fields of plastic surgery, urology, endocrinology, nursing and social services.

It is unconscionable that an individual can disseminate such erroneous information in his radio time and be so careless with his research on an issue.

I would urge responsible adults to somehow review the work of “Voices For Freedom” and use this work as an example of how easy it is for false information to be disseminated to the gullible public.

Peter E. Cannava, M.D., Soldotna

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