Supporters of developmental disability services wave signs last Friday, Feb. 7, at WKFL Park in Homer. About 25 people participated in the annual statewide Key Campaign to advocate for programs in Alaska. Jay Bechtol, chief executive officer of South Peninsula Behavioral Health Services, said the rally was “to recognize people with disabilities are a part of our community.” “We are here to promote funding and services for those who experience developmental disabilities,” said Lisa Harbold-Pitta, community service director for PRIDE (Promoting Responsibility, Individual Development and Empowerment), Homer’s program for people with developmental disabilities. She said there is a wait list in the 100s statewide for people to get into programs for the developmentally disabled. “They don’t have full access to this community. That’s what we’re about,” Harbold-Pitta said. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Supporters of developmental disability services wave signs last Friday, Feb. 7, at WKFL Park in Homer. About 25 people participated in the annual statewide Key Campaign to advocate for programs in Alaska. Jay Bechtol, chief executive officer of South Peninsula Behavioral Health Services, said the rally was “to recognize people with disabilities are a part of our community.” “We are here to promote funding and services for those who experience developmental disabilities,” said Lisa Harbold-Pitta, community service director for PRIDE (Promoting Responsibility, Individual Development and Empowerment), Homer’s program for people with developmental disabilities. She said there is a wait list in the 100s statewide for people to get into programs for the developmentally disabled. “They don’t have full access to this community. That’s what we’re about,” Harbold-Pitta said. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Best Bets

Fair warning, Betsterites. Tomorrow is the day that strikes terror into the hearts of men. You guys can face down a raging Bering Sea storm, climb high mountains, run 1,200-mile sled dog races and build log cabins with just a chain saw. Pick out the perfect gift for your sweetie? Write a love poem that expresses your passion eloquently? Yeah, that got ya sweating, didn’t it?

And why should it be men who stress so much? In our egalitarian, hetero nonconforming modern world, maybe women also get stressed in relationships. Not all relationships are between men and women, too. The old cliches don’t necesssairily hold true.

Romance is romance is romance. Why should an arbitrary holiday dictate how we behave toward those who love? Why should we have to craft the perfect day and face the penalty of a ruined relationship?

Love forgives. Love is messy. Love is not perfect. In the scramble of emotions and confused feelings, sometimes the details get jumbled. Sometimes we don’t pick out the perfect chocolate or the right dozen roses. Sometimes we forget to make dinner reservations and, well, this town being small and with limited winter dining opportunities, have to settle for candles and fast food.

So take a little love advice from the Betster:

• Keep it simple. If that awesome woman with the rainbow mermaid hair and the Parisian fashion sense catches your eye, don’t try too hard. Most any chocolate will do, and why go all out with an elaborate floral arrangement when one simple rose does the trick?

• Make it genuine. The Betster has sometimes thought of starting a Valentine’s Day poetry writing service and be Cyrano to your Roxane, but honestly, they’ll see right through that. If you want to write poetry, the Betster suggests a simple couplet, although if you can pull off a sonnet, well, go Shakespeare.

• Learn your love language. You can say “I love you” not just in words, but in actions, like making espresso for your sweetheart every morning. Think of ways of saying “I love you” wihtout actually, you know, saying “I love you.”

• Live your love. Here’s the coolest thing about romance. It might start off with fireworks and intensity, but as you grow in your love, it’s transformed into daily comfort. Love can be like a feel-good rom-com where you just know the awkward couple who don’t know they’re in love discover it at the end, but it can also be one of those sweet stories of an older couple walking on the beach holding hands. Bonus: No one dies tragically at the end.

So embrace Valentine’s Day and don’t fear it, maybe with these Best Bets:

BEST HOPPED UP BET: Wondering who won the beer label contest for Grace Ridge Brewery’s Zodiak Black IPA? Find out at 5 p.m. today when the brewery reveals the winner of the contest. View all the beautiful and wonderful art submitted for the Zodiac Black IPA. This event is free and open to the public.

BEST BRING DUFFY BACK BET: It’s been almost four months since Anesha “Duffy” Murnane disappeared Oct. 17 from her Homer apartment. In a Community Conversation faciliated by her family and friends with the Homer Police Department at 5:30 p.m. today at the Alaska Islands and Ocean Visitor Center, learn about law enforcement efforts in the ongoing case and ways community members can help in the search. This will also be a great opportunity to ask questions. For those unable to attend in person, there will be a live video feed from the Bring Duffy Home Facebook page.

BEST WILD HORSES COULDN’T KEEP US AWAY BET: Bunnel Street Arts Center offers an intimate space for musical performances, and this house concert by The Horsenecks ought to be special. The Oregon and United Kingdom based duo plays oldtime and bluegrass tunes. Catch them at 7L30 p.m. today at Bunnell. Tickets are $15-$25 or pay as you can and available at bunnellarts.org.

BEST SING AWAY BET: Want to woo your sweetheart with that velvety voice of yours? Sing your heart out and dance like no one’s watching at the Valentine’s Day Karaoke Dance Party from 7-11 p.m. at the Que’ana Bar & Sleeping Lady Gifts at the historic 1954 roadhouse at Mile 122.5 Sterling Highway near Happy Valley. Come share the love on Valentine’s Day!

BEST LOVE A VET BET: Veterans, family and friends: Do you miss the camaraderie you once felt while in the military? Do you have a family member or friend who misses the camaraderie? Bring a dish (nothing messy), a positive attitude, and an openness to meet others at Valentines for Veterans from 6-8 p.m. Friday at the Kachemak Bay Campus. Introduce yourselves and then share a potluck meal and enjoy the music of Mike Tupper. There also will be activities to get to know each other better followed by a presentation by Devony Lehrer from the Independent Living Center about their programs and how veterans can partner together to make the community even better.

BEST FEST BET: A band of accomplished and powerful women, the Hussy Hicks have made a name for themselves locally and on the international stage the old fashioned way – by playing their music and connecting with audences one passionate performance at a time. Hear them at 9 p.m. Saturday at Alice’s Champagne Palace.

Since their incredible performances at Salmonfest 2018 as a duo, and joining Kristy Lee and Michael Franti on stage, the Hussies have made a name and fanbase for themselves in Alaska. Julz Parker is widely recognised amongst her peers as one of Australia’s finest guitar players and Leesa Gentz’s powerhouse stage presence, soaring vocals and massive smile will steal your heart, have you hanging on every note and leave a tingle dancing down your spine.

Supporters of developmental disability services wave signs last Friday, Feb. 7, 2020, at WKFL Park in Homer, Alaska. About 25 people participated in the annual statewide Key Campaign to advocate for programs in Alaska. Jay Bechtol, chief executive officer of South Peninsula Behavioral Health Services, said the rally was “to recognize people with disabilities are a part of our community.” “We are here to promote funding and services for those who experience developmental disabilities,” said Lisa Harbold-Pitta, community service director for PRIDE (Promoting Responsibility, Individual Development and Empowerment), Homer’s program for people with developmental disabilities. She said there is a wait list in the 100s statewide for people to get into programs for the developmentally disabled. “They don’t have full access to this community. That’s what we’re about,” Harbold-Pitta said. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Supporters of developmental disability services wave signs last Friday, Feb. 7, 2020, at WKFL Park in Homer, Alaska. About 25 people participated in the annual statewide Key Campaign to advocate for programs in Alaska. Jay Bechtol, chief executive officer of South Peninsula Behavioral Health Services, said the rally was “to recognize people with disabilities are a part of our community.” “We are here to promote funding and services for those who experience developmental disabilities,” said Lisa Harbold-Pitta, community service director for PRIDE (Promoting Responsibility, Individual Development and Empowerment), Homer’s program for people with developmental disabilities. She said there is a wait list in the 100s statewide for people to get into programs for the developmentally disabled. “They don’t have full access to this community. That’s what we’re about,” Harbold-Pitta said. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

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