Mist rises over Hidden Lake in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Mist rises over Hidden Lake in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Best Bets

Just when you think Homer has rounded the corner into crispier temperatures, danged if Ma Nature doesn’t surprise us — again.

We’re kinda on a roller coaster here with our weather, and it’s definitely an E-ticket ride. Don’t think you’re on the kiddy ride, where the car goes up and down mellow hills. This is the full-throttle, alpine climb track that rolls down into six loops followed by an Evil Knievel jump over the Grand Canyon.

It’s been typhoon, sunshine, typhoon, sunshine, with patches of sedate clouds. Oh yeah, the temperatures have been getting a tad nippy at night, as the Betster found out on a recent camping expedition, but the sun still cranks out some BTUs at high noon.

We’ve had some fierce winds blowing politically, but not to worry, Betsteroids — that intense City of Homer election has ended. The candidates acted so gosh dern polite to each other for awhile there it looked like they might endorse their opponents. If this civility continues, we might not have anything to grump about this winter and then what would we do? Play cribbage?

Well, fear not. The state and national election is still to come, and as near as the Betster can tell, it remains a bit rough. Tighten down the hatches. It could get rowdy.

Meanwhile, in our kind, compassionate little town, we’re easing into the winter to come — but not yet! — with lots of fun things to do. You can still get out and about, and will, because as the Norwegians say, “There is no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing.” The Permanent Fun Dividend checks hit our accounts today, so be prudent and spend it on wise things, like a new raincoat. As the poet Basho said, “Winter downpour / even the monkey needs a raincoat.”

Sunshine or rain, get ready, get out there, because that’s a 10-4 good buddy and time to have fun, perhaps with these Best Bets:

BEST BIG BUBBLY BET: The Betster has heard of sauerkraut and kimchi, but fermented garlic? Well, why not? Learn how to make this delicacy with the Homer Folk School’s class from 6-7 p.m. tonight at A Healing Place on Bunnell Avenue. The fee is $25. For more information, visit https://www.homerfolkschool.org/classes-1/#!event/2018/10/4/fermented-garlic.

BEST MAY THE FIRST BE WITH YOU: It’s First Friday on Oct. 5, and time to put on your walking shoes and stroll around the galleries. Don’t miss the South Peninsula Haven House art fundraiser at Grace Ridge Brewery starting at 5:30 p.m.

BEST WALK AND DON’T LOOK BACK BET: If it does rain Saturday, you can head indoors to the SPARC and take a Walk with a Doc from 9-10 a.m. Physical therapist Minda Morris is this month’s health provider. She will talk on pelvic health physical therapy. After the talk, walk at your own pace and ask any questions.

BEST BIG BOOTHS BET: While you’re over at the SPARC, swing by Homer Middle School for The October Festival from 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Saturday. More than 40 booths are featured, and odds are there will be something with pumpkin spice.

Birch and aspen trees offer a splash of fall color by Hidden Lake looking toward Skilak Lake in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Birch and aspen trees offer a splash of fall color by Hidden Lake looking toward Skilak Lake in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

A black bear crosses the Skilak Lake Road in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)                                A black bear crosses the Skilak Lake Road in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

A black bear crosses the Skilak Lake Road in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News) A black bear crosses the Skilak Lake Road in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

A black bear crosses the Skilak Lake Road in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

A black bear crosses the Skilak Lake Road in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Bear poop with berries and seeds is in a trail near Hidden Lake in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Bear poop with berries and seeds is in a trail near Hidden Lake in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Birch trees offer a splash of fall color by Hidden Creek near Hidden Lake in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Birch trees offer a splash of fall color by Hidden Creek near Hidden Lake in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Birch trees offer a splash of fall color by Hidden Creek near Hidden Lake in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Birch trees offer a splash of fall color by Hidden Creek near Hidden Lake in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Birch trees offer a splash of fall color by Hidden Lake in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

Birch trees offer a splash of fall color by Hidden Lake in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

A black bear crosses the Skilak Lake Road in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

A black bear crosses the Skilak Lake Road in the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge on Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018, near Sterling, Alaska. (Photo by Michael Armstrong/Homer News)

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